ota hdtv antena

#1
have bought a 1byone 50mile radius indoor hdtv antenna and it works ok so far and picks up 46 channels in my area.I live in tucson,arizona and we are gonna be ditching dish and going 100% ota hdtv antenna use on at least 5 tvs.I am thinking about trying a few more to see which ones can get the most channels including getting some indoor/outdoor antennas.What are some of the best that can go well over the 50 mile range one i have right now?
 

Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#2
I count 17 primary channels (XX.1) available in the Tucson area.

Leave the XX.2, XX.3, etc. channels out of your count and if you get 17 XX.1 channels, that is about all you can count on because the next channels nearby are 100 miles away up in Phoenix.
 
#4
Are there any antennas that can go around or over a 100 mile range?I have also bought the antop at-400bv indoor/outdoor antenna.So far the most channels i have gotten with the 1by one antenna is 46 channels.
 
#6
The Short answer to your question is No!
While there are locations where reliable, or semi reliable reception of signals from over 100 miles takes place.
For the most part VHF/UHF television signals are line of sight, and limited to about 70 miles by the curvature of the earth.
 

Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#7
Well, lemme put it this way, if you have a 500 ft tower and the very best UHF/VHF antenna with RG-11 cable and the proper ultra-low noise signal boosters in the line you MIGHT occasionally get signal from Phoenix in the Tucson area if you're not blocked by a mountain or some other obstruction.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#8
Duke,

At that range there is almost no signal to be received. Back in the analog TV days, there was a (real) channel 6 in Portland, Oregon and a (real) channel 6 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. I live between them in Seattle and with extreme efforts I was able to receive both channels, from time-to-time. However, low-band VHF channels carry farther than UHF channels.

Another example is KVOS-12, which is 75 miles away from me. In the analog days it was on real Channel 12 which is high-band VHF and it was easily received -- but when the went digital, they moved to real Channel 35: I tried over a dozen different antennas to receive it with no luck. So, I went back to my Ham Radio days and built my own antenna specifically engineered to receive that one channel. You can see photos of my 'Project-35' in my albums here on the Forum. The only way to possibly receive from that distance is using extreme measures and in my opinion, it would be unlikely to work.

Jim
 

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