Outdoor Antenna Grounding

#1
I just installed my Antennas Direct DB4 on the side of my house last week but I have not messed with the ground of it yet. My problem is, I have a planter and sidewalk directly below the antenna that wraps around my house, so I'd like to install a ground rod about 25' away to the East side of my house if possible. I can maybe run the ground wire through the attic to the other side of the house, then down and below to the ground where I could put a ground rod. Is this ok? Is this possible or do I have to mess up my wife's lovely rose bed.

Also, I think I need to use a coax antenna discharge unit but my question is where do I place it? My coax runs from the side of the house up to the roof, then down into a splitter. The coax is very well hidden, but I'm under the impression that I need to add the discharge unit right before the coax enters my house? Is that correct? Any recommendations what to use?
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#2
I just installed my Antennas Direct DB4 on the side of my house last week but I have not messed with the ground of it yet. My problem is, I have a planter and sidewalk directly below the antenna that wraps around my house, so I'd like to install a ground rod about 25' away to the East side of my house if possible. I can maybe run the ground wire through the attic to the other side of the house, then down and below to the ground where I could put a ground rod. Is this ok? Is this possible or do I have to mess up my wife's lovely rose bed.

Also, I think I need to use a coax antenna discharge unit but my question is where do I place it? My coax runs from the side of the house up to the roof, then down into a splitter. The coax is very well hidden, but I'm under the impression that I need to add the discharge unit right before the coax enters my house? Is that correct? Any recommendations what to use?
Note too if you want to be totally in code, besides NEC rules there are local Electrical Codes as well in most places.

That is where to add the grounding block.

You idea of snaking the ground wire all over the place is not only not up to code, it won't even help, and maybe make it worse, but being a bigger lightning attractor. Lightning also won't follow a wire if you are hit. I doesn't like to take corners.

Normally the best way to install a TV antenna is the cable comes down the house straight from the antenna, then enters the house. Where it enters the house there is normally a small loop for both water dripping and it confuses lightning from following the coax. Right there you want a ground block the coax screws into then another run goes in the house. The ground wire from that block needs to travel straight down to a ground rod. There should also be another ground wire from the TV antenna mast to that ground rod. #10 wire is a minimum used for ground wire.

Go here, there are good pictures as well.
Antenna Basics
Scroll down to "Grounding outdoor antennas"
 

Tim58hsv

DTVUSA Member
#3
What about those surge protectors that you plug your electronic devices into? The newer ones have coaxial inputs too. Would those protect your tv's, vcr's, etc from lightening striking the antenna? Doubt they're up to code but would they work?

And how often does lightning strike an antenna? Personally I've never heard of it happening but have no doubt that it does from time to time.
 
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