PC to TV for watching Internet TV: What's your setup?

#2
I have a VGA Cable that I hook up to the LCD in the family room every once in a while to watch movies or play roms/emulators. MGM has started putting full movies on Youtube as well as public domain films and some 80's shows like He-man and stuff.
 

Jason Fritz

Administrator
Staff member
#3
My current setup:

Dell XPS M1530 w/ HDMI output


Verizon 3G USB card connected to Cradlepoint CTR350 Router


Mitsubishi 40" LT-4133 LCD HDTV w/ HDMI input



To be continued
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#4
Mine is simple. VGA cable from the computer to the TV. I have to set the resolution on the computer or the TV coughs up black (screen). I can't remember the danged rez and always have to experiment to do it. I have to unplug my monitor because I only have one video card. I thought about buying a second card (as cheap or cheaper than a switch) and have it to I can just switch to it. I should, it would be handy.

VGA is not high def, but then again neither is the streaming video off the net on my computer. If want to watch DVD I just use the DVD player.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#5
We would, except, of course, my wife can't hear the dialog, and none of them are providing closed captions on most of their programming (and most are not providing any closed captions at all).
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#6
We would, except, of course, my wife can't hear the dialog, and none of them are providing closed captions on most of their programming (and most are not providing any closed captions at all).
Come on Bicker! You could watch the show and sign for her. Then you both could enjoy internet TV:dance: It sounds like you found your calling. We should figure out a way to convert the dialog to captions:behindsofa:

I'm still working on my MythTV for the projector. I know I've been dragging my feet. When I get it completed and connected I'll post back some pictures in the gallery.
 

Jason Fritz

Administrator
Staff member
#7
We would, except, of course, my wife can't hear the dialog, and none of them are providing closed captions on most of their programming (and most are not providing any closed captions at all).
Bicker, went on Hulu this afternoon to take some screen snapshots and noticed that they are starting to offer CC options for some shows,



 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#8
Come on Bicker! You could watch the show and sign for her.
I probably could, after a few days of refresher -- but the problem with that idea is that she cannot read signing! :frustrated: She reads lips, which is great when the characters are facing the camera instead of facing each other, with their backs to the camera, or off-screen.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#9
Bicker, went on Hulu this afternoon to take some screen snapshots and noticed that they are starting to offer CC options for some shows,
Yup, Hulu is the one exception -- their software actually supports closed captioning while the rest (including Netflix) don't even have the capability. However, as you alluded to, even with Hulu, only a small fraction of the programming has captions.
 
#10
I leave the resolution on mine at 800x600, then I set the tv to widescreen. No stretching or anything and the quality looks fine to me, I mainly play roms/emulators on it.
 

Aries

DTVUSA Member
#11
I leave the resolution on mine at 800x600, then I set the tv to widescreen. No stretching or anything and the quality looks fine to me, I mainly play roms/emulators on it.
Heh, I did that back a while ago when I had a computer with a TV setup. I had a PS2 emulator on my beast of a computer, and I jacked the graphics settings up to maximum and played my games in seriously high definition.

You have not played Final Fantasy 12 unless you've played it on an emulator with the graphics up to maximum. I swear to God you could count the hairs on Balthier's head if you were so inclined.

PCSX2 is the emulator I use, it works a beast. I'll have to see if taking the ISO from the disk will improve the loading times any.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#13
Pushing live (HD) video through the air is dodgy. Best bet is to have the video directly connected to the playback device via wire. You can use wireless to download video, for playback at a later time, but if you want to use a computer as your DVR, then it is best to place the computer right next to the television.

However, there are devices that do support wireless video distribution. You can find one here:

Sling Media - SlingCatcher
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#14
How about the HDHomeRun? What does that do exactly?

I was thinking about getting a wireless router and hooking up the Vizio GV42LF to the computer via the WiFi, too. That is lacking bandwidth or stability or some such?
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#15
For wi-fi to work, you need a wi-fi device, designed for that purpose, on each side of the wi-fi connection. Generally, televisions, if they support wi-fi, only support it for either firmware update, or for specific connections to specific Internet services. I don't know of any that have built-in clients for playing television programs off of a computer elsewhere.

My TiVo has that capability, but the TiVo is a computer, really, and it needs to sit within cable-distance of the television. Then the TiVo can exploit wi-fi to pull video off of a computer elsewhere in the house. (Though, we're still much better off not using wi-fi... using a wired connection instead.)
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#16
So a Tivo is another option?

Ive also considered getting a Philips DVD Player with a USB port and using Thumb Drives to the Philips DVD player.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#17
TiVo has a lot of broadband features. You can record programming, transfer that programming to other TiVos in the same home, transfer the programming back to the TiVo, etc.
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#18
Id be interested in a way to view video on the TV, but my computers are in another room.

Is there a way to do it wirelessly?
I've used the Terk Leapfrog LF-30 from satellite receiver to TV with fairly decent success. The only time I have seen problems, is in homes using cordless phones running the same frequency. I've never connected one to a PC for viewing streaming video. I'll have to hook one up and report back with the results.
 

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#20
Ive seen the Terk's as well, but they are only SD correct?
That I'm not 100% sure of? I don't see why it would matter if the signal was HD or SD. I'll have to pull one out of the junk closet and connect it up, just for fun. I'll try streaming in both of the SD and HD to see what happens.
 
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