People don't want TV anymore

AG99

DTVUSA Member
#1
This article is a bit confusing for me (Cord Cutters And The Death Of TV - Business Insider), but as far as I can make out, people are cutting the cord not only to traditional cable companies, but also to broadband internet. Ditching the cable companies is an obvious trend (could they suck more?), but broadband? Don't you need an internet connection to watch shows, even if you're stealing them?

Apparently the move to tablets and other mobile devices is leading people to get their content over free wifi at coffee shops and similar places. Many cities offer free wifi as well; you can get it almost anywhere.

Still, I can't imagine going to Starbucks every time I want to watch "Castle." Why wouldn't these people want broadband in their homes? I don't think I understand this article very well. It can't be saying what I think it's saying.
 
#2
Yeah, I don't think I would ever cut the cord on broadband unless I ended up landing in one of the cities that provide free WiFi that I can reasonably use in my home....
The main question, I guess, would be what type of download speed would you need to get for free to make this a realistic option? Like you, the 2 miles to the closest Starbucks or McDonalds from my home is a bit too far to travel to stream TV....
 

AG99

DTVUSA Member
#3
Free wifi isn't what you'd want to do most of your internet business on anyway. It's unsecured. I'm not checking my bank account or buying something on Amazon in Starbucks!
 
#4
Agreed. Because a lot of wi-fi is free at places like McDonalds or Starbucks, it tends to not be very secure. In the end, you get what you paid for. I use wi-fi at McDonalds quite a bit for just surfing the net or maybe downloading a podcast. I would never use it for banking or anything like that.
 
#5
Well, one way we learned while abroad is that we could use the VPN that we paid for to watch US TV abroad to also give us an encrypted connection while using free WiFi...not a huge hit on the speed, and the peace of mind that we wouldn't have to worry about crooks or teeny boppers trying to sniff our traffic to steal banking or other passwords!
That being said, I think of passwords similar to underwear...if you're not changing them frequently, then you're leaving yourself open to having information or more importantly, money stolen!!
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#6
One of the high school kids..who is very smart in tech...enough to make money developing content...easily got into Sbux cash register/cc system...through his smartphone. I know the kid personally. he did not do anything to disrupt the store...he was doing what he knows how to do. No one knows about it except myself and another person.
 
#7
Well, one way we learned while abroad is that we could use the VPN that we paid for to watch US TV abroad to also give us an encrypted connection while using free WiFi...not a huge hit on the speed, and the peace of mind that we wouldn't have to worry about crooks or teeny boppers trying to sniff our traffic to steal banking or other passwords!
Makes me veeeeery, very nervous. Bottom line, if your browser has any security issues, VPN is not even a factor. And every browser has security issues except possibly Chome -- and then only on a Chromebook. They can't even protect against the complete takeover of your computer, let alone a trivial little thing like reading a password. Of course, any online security is a joke, even through a dedicated ISP. (No employee at TWC, or Comcast, or Verizon, or ... would ever do anything bad, WOULD THEY???)

https://www.ncp-e.com/fileadmin/pdf/techpapers/Debunking_the_Myths_of_SSL_VPN_Security.pdf

Rick
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#8
And money is money -- so broadband isn't the cheapest thing in the world either so some may be going to alternatives to save $$.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#9
And money is money -- so broadband isn't the cheapest thing in the world either so some may be going to alternatives to save $$.
Given the choice of just ONE - Pay TV, phone, or broadband -

Broadband wins, hands down. With it I can watch TV and make phone calls for little or no extra money.
 
#10
I can see people wanting to do away with their cable, I get that. I can't imagine not having the internet in some way, shape or form. I think that for most people in this day and age, it's a must.
 
#11
Cable is overpriced and offers little choice. Broadband has replaced the telephone as a basic utilty. I do think though people like Tv it just the traditinal way of paying for it is comming to the end. The current cable tv and sattelite market is obsolete. They better offering bandwidth then a preset channel lineup.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#12
Cable is overpriced and offers little choice. Broadband has replaced the telephone as a basic utilty. I do think though people like Tv it just the traditinal way of paying for it is comming to the end. The current cable tv and sattelite market is obsolete. They better offering bandwidth then a preset channel lineup.
I wouldn't say obsolete...there are many things that cable/satellite offers that is better than streaming such as DVRs, more programming, and ease of use. Streaming TV may just be the next big thing, but cable/satellite could fend it off by getting rid of useless channels and lowering their price.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#13
I wouldn't say obsolete...there are many things that cable/satellite offers that is better than streaming such as DVRs, more programming, and ease of use. Streaming TV may just be the next big thing, but cable/satellite could fend it off by getting rid of useless channels and lowering their price.
But they won't unbundle, and they won't lower prices.

They WILL, however, offer you the "privilege" of streaming shows you already pay for via traditional cable or satellite TV. They will also continue to make sure that you pay for each and every TV / device you watch on. You also will never be able to provide your own set-top box, you will only be able to rent it from them. And the monthly rental price for each box will continue to rise.

And they will continue to charge customers too much for what they don't want.
 

Lily13

DTVUSA Member
#14
I don't see the sense with that, it doesn't really give you... the sense of security? I like to feel that the internet connection in my house is a service I've paid for and that I'm entitled to now, that I can get technical assistance when needed etc. Sure I love free wifi in Starbucks or McDonalds when I'm travelling, especially abroad, and it's the only way for me to catch up with the news. But to rely on it for everything? Just stupid.
 
#16
I don't see the sense with that, it doesn't really give you... the sense of security? I like to feel that the internet connection in my house is a service I've paid for and that I'm entitled to now, that I can get technical assistance when needed etc. Sure I love free wifi in Starbucks or McDonalds when I'm travelling, especially abroad, and it's the only way for me to catch up with the news. But to rely on it for everything? Just stupid.
Maybe eventually free wifi will expand to a levele where it is all that is needed. Places like Todos Santos Park in Concord, CA broadcast free wifi for about a ten block radius. Things like colleges and libraries offer it for free and it extends beyond the buildings. I personally don't think we are there yet, but I won't be surprised to hear when cities increase taxes so they can offer wifi to all their constituents
 

FWAmie

DTVUSA Member
#17
This article is a bit confusing for me (Cord Cutters And The Death Of TV - Business Insider), but as far as I can make out, people are cutting the cord not only to traditional cable companies, but also to broadband internet. Ditching the cable companies is an obvious trend (could they suck more?), but broadband? Don't you need an internet connection to watch shows, even if you're stealing them?

Apparently the move to tablets and other mobile devices is leading people to get their content over free wifi at coffee shops and similar places. Many cities offer free wifi as well; you can get it almost anywhere.

- See more at: http://www.dtvusaforum.com/internet-tv/53142-people-dont-want-tv-anymore.html#sthash.Hn87UAs3.dpuf

Yes you still need internet connection to watch the shows but everything seems to be done on Wi-Fi. I mean I don't mind having Wi-Fi at places like coffee shops or similar places, but I wouldn't be there all the time if I had to go to places like that just to get it.
 
#18
I enjoy watching my favorites shows on my television and don' t think I going to get rid of cable no time sooner. Especially because that's how I'm able to use my laptop. But I must say smartphones and tablets are definitely taking over.
 
#19
A possible interpretation of Cord Cutters And The Death Of TV - Business Insider This should not be regarded as the final word, but a jumping off point for discussion.

The "5 million people [who] ended their cable and broadband subs between the beginning of 2010 and the end of this year" does not factor in new subscribers to attain a net loss figure, So we can dispense with that.

According to the article, the "most important chart" is "Net Subscriber Adds" accross all types of customers -- cable TV, broadband internet and landline phone. The chart shows "Net Adds" (presumably new customers minus dropped customers) zig-zagging up and down at approximately the same times each year. The chart is divided into quarters of a year. To compare apples to apples, there were c. 575,000 net adds in quarter 1 of 2010 and c. 210,000 net adds in quarter 1 of 2013. There is enough of a net decrease in the second quarter each year, that it looks like there may be a net decrease for the entire year of 2013 -- BUT the fourth quarter of 2013 isn't charted yet. If this pans out, it will be the first net decrease since 2009, and possibly since all three services were widely available.

The net losses in quarter 2 of 2013 bottomed out at about 300,000, so absolute worst case scenario would be a total loss of less than 100,000 subscribers in 2013. Again, the first net loss in quite a few years. This is against a total subscriber base of what? The article doesn't specify, but a chart indicates the Nielson universe was 114,000 in 2013. Nielson recently announced they are expanding the definition of a TV household to include homes with TVs getting signal from broadband only, whence the total households is slated to increase to 115.6 million in 2014. So we can take 115 million as a working base.

So the net loss is very close to one out of every 1,150 TV households. I can't get all teary eyed over a loss of less than one-tenth of 1% after many years of growth.

Of course, the population is rising. So can we deduce there are increasing numbers of hermits out there with NO CATV, NO broadcast TV and NO broadband TV service? I seriously doubt it. In addition to free WiFi on the road, there are more and more WiFi setups in individual homes Hence, there are more and more friendly neighbors across the street and across apartment hallways, willing to share their WiFi connections.

At a level well under 1%, illicit sharing is nearly impossible to detect, and cable providers enable it by increasing bandwidth year after year. They also increase their prices more than proportionately, so as a whole, the industry is still gaining capital. As the article points out, CATV stock prices rose slightly in 2013.

Rick
 
#20
So can we deduce there are increasing numbers of hermits out there with NO CATV, NO broadcast TV and NO broadband TV service? I seriously doubt it.
I really shouldn't conflate people who don't watch TV with hermits. :embarrassed: I had two young female piano students years ago who had NO TV in the house!! Their mother home schooled them and was there at every lesson. Haven't seen them in over twelve years, but I have a feeling they turned out all right.

Rick
 
Top