Pls help me choose the right antenna.

seanxxwang

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
Here is report of signal analysis.
My TV is Panasonic Plasma TC-PC65GT30, which was purchased ~2 years ago and was the latest mode at that time.
It will be mounted on top of chimney of single floor roof. The TV is located next to the fireplace, so the distance is mostly the height.
The goal is to as maximum and best HD signals as possible, no rotator/pre-amplifier if possible.

Pls help me choose the right antenna(s). Budget is ~$200 and I already have cables.

Thanks in advance!
 
#2
:welcome: seanxxwang,

Wow, what a TV Fool Report! No rotator or amplifier will be required. The only problem is that your many strong signals are separated by approximately 60 degrees on the compass. A plain old 4-bay bowtie would not have quite the beam width to handle that. Also, your sole NBC station is RF12 -- high VHF. So I recommend a Clearstream 2-V antenna from Antennas Direct. It has an unusually wide beam width of 70 degrees, and it will get the few high VHF signals in your area.

I think you're going to be very happy with the results. In fact, if I were you I'd try it indoors first. If you get good, watchable signals inside, why bother with the hassle of grounding and outdoor maintenance? (I can't wait to see what the experts have to say about the bomb I just dropped. :eyes:)

Antennas Direct ClearStream 2 C2-V Long Range Indoor/Outdoor VHF/UHF HDTV Antenna (C2V) from Solid Signal

Rick
 
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seanxxwang

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#3
Thanks Rick.

Yes, most of the signals from 307--359, how about the those signals from 155-167 which seems locate about opposite direction of the main strong signal group. Do I need to get a second antenna to cover signal from that angle?

I am a newbie for the antenna. How about the pointing? How do I adjust the antenna pointing by referring and correlating to the compass map direction shown from report?
 
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dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#4
You have plenty of signals coming from the north. I wouldn't worry about the ones from the south. Most would be repeats. Rick's antenna advice is solid. Pointed north northwest.
 
#5
Those are possibly receivable much lower signal level stations that would likely require a large directional antenna in that direction. There is no simple way to mix two antennas pointed different directions with reliable easily predictable results. The results are normally loss of signal from both directions. The easiest way is to use two coax runs to an A/B switch, or two tuners. If one has the time, patience, and does the research such antenna systems can be built. You might want to read this to get an idea what can be involve when working to receive signals from multiple television markets with no rotator. http://www.dtvusaforum.com/dtv-hdtv...nument-co-ota-results-3-antenna-solution.html
I think Rick gave you one of the best simple answers.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#7
I really think your signals are so strong and so much in a line from NNW to SSE that a single antenna pointed NNW will get it all, and anything from the SSE should be considered a "bonus". It may not necessarily require an antenna designed for VHF-lo, channel 7 (ABC) is quite strong and a basic 4 bay antenna should have no problem getting it. Some UHF antennas with Fancy baluns that block VHF may be a problem, though.
 
#8
I fixed the link in my first post, cause you apparently broke it buying the product! :becky: Guess they only had the one open box C2-V.

Nobody bit on my "bomb" per an indoor installation. I'd better clarify. There's no way I can tell, from here in Wisconsin, whether you'll get any signal at all indoors. It's just that there are some people who are happier set up indoors because they have strong signals like you, and the building materials in their homes play nice with RF waves. Costs nothing to try.

As RFSteve mentioned, the only way to get the transmitters from the south is with a second antenna combined with either an A/B switch or a two tuner system. And if you want to go all the way down to KFTY and KOTR you'd need a HUMUNGOUS 10 foot antenna, and the signals would conflict with one another anyhow.

MrPogi got it right -- point north-northwest and enjoy something like 62 channels from 25 separate transmitters. Please let us know how it turns out! :playball:

Rick
 

seanxxwang

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#9
You are absolutely right, Rick! I placed the order via your link....^_^

I will try indoor but most likely I will end up mounting it to my chimney to pursue perfectionism as I always do, LOL. I do think your indoor suggestion is very good and helpful!

I just notice that the one I ordered does not have the mount bracket. Is this one the same with mount bracket? Should I call them and change the order to this one so that I have everything to mount it or I can easily buy somewhere else separately to to mount it to the chimney?
 

seanxxwang

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#11
Hi Rick et al

I am reporting back that I bought the C2V as Rick recommended and mounted it into my attic. With compass's help, antenna is pointing to ~333 degree related to truth north, (307+359)/2 = 333. TV receives ~85 channels. With 2/3 of them are duplicates, it left me around ~26 channel, ditch the channels in different language other than English, I have ~15 channels. Among these, I have 5-6 HD channels that I am interested and care about, such as ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, KRON. I have not tried to fine tune it by working with the pointing, re-scanning, or even put it out on top of my roof etc. but hey, I am already happy with the result, so why not bothering.

Thanks Rick and others help. Really appreciated it.

One question is that if the signal may be compromised or weaken when cables are connected with many segments, (5 segment from TV to antenna), also cable, which runs already very long in the crawl space around the house to the attic, is longer than it needs to be.

-Sean
 
#13
I am reporting back that I bought the C2V as Rick recommended and mounted it into my attic. ... Thanks Rick and others help. Really appreciated it. ... One question is that if the signal may be compromised or weaken when cables are connected with many segments, (5 segment from TV to antenna), also cable, which runs already very long in the crawl space around the house to the attic, is longer than it needs to be.
Thanks very much for the report! Once in a while we luck out. :thumb:

As long as your attic plays nice with RF waves, I think it's a good compromise between indoors and outdoors. You won't need to worry about it coming down in an earthquake and hitting a power line. With 5 separate segments you must have 4 connectors. Each one subtracts 0.5 dB from the signal. With the long cable run, you might be cutting your signal 3 dB or more -- which means you're operating at half power.

I agree with Steve; keep it simple. Shoot, you could wind up with over a hundred channels!

Rick
 

seanxxwang

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#14
Yep, 4 connectors including the one from wall to my TV. I need a very long cable to substitute these segments and I will see what I can do later.

Now, Rick and Steve, you guys are invited to come over, lay back in the couch and enjoy watching my 60 inch TV. Oh, please help yourselves with beers...
 

DW-77

DTVUSA Member
#15
Congratulations Sean. Based on your TVFool report, and with the antenna Rick recommended, you should be able to enjoy many channels.
As far as the cable is concerned, not sure what type of coax your current segments are made of, but if you ever plan on "consolidating" it, I would suggest you use RG-6 coax. There are many very strong channels there that may not care; but reducing the cable loss may help you bring in even more.
 
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