RCA ANT751 versus Winegard HD7698P

jonnyd97

DTVUSA Member
#1
Why in the world would I be getting *better* reception with a ANT751 rather than with a HD7698P? The RCA is three feet long while the Winegard is 14 feet long! Even when I bypass the coupler board on the Winegard (for testing purposes) I get results *no better than* what I can get with the RCA medium range antenna. What can I do to get better results out of my Winegard unit? Thanks fellows!
 
#2
Why in the world would I be getting *better* reception with a ANT751 rather than with a HD7698P? The RCA is three feet long while the Winegard is 14 feet long! Even when I bypass the coupler board on the Winegard (for testing purposes) I get results *no better than* what I can get with the RCA medium range antenna. What can I do to get better results out of my Winegard unit? Thanks fellows!
You can aim the antenna. The HD7698P is a very directional antenna for people in deep fringe areas. According to Winegard, the beam width varies from 19 to 41 degrees depending on the station. The figure I've seen for the ANT751 is 70 degrees -- so about twice the beam width.

For a fair test you have to aim both antennas in the exact direction of each transmitter and compare signal strengths on a variety of stations. That might be hard if you don't have a signal meter -- the meter in a TV is a signal "quality" meter, and the definition of quality varies from one brand to the next.

Try this: find a station that's very spotty with the RCA antenna -- comes in, but frequently drops out, pixelated, etc. Then aim the HD7698P right at the tower. Pretty good chance it'll come in clear as crystal. Course if you need the wider beam to get the stations you want, then you don't need the HD7698P.

Rick

Just read the other thread. Could be the coupler board.
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#3
Jonny,

For most practical purposes high signal strength means very little and as Ricki wrote, signal quality is what matters. A low-level clean signal always beats a dirty high-level signal.

Jim
 
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