Question: Ready to switch, but very confused for the right antenna

guesswork

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
here is the TV fool report TV Fool

i would like to stay away from a rotor. i have a few trees to the east of my house. it will be placed outside on the roof or i will put up a pole.

Looked at a lot of websites and i am still confused on the right antenna that would work for me. i have looked at the Mohu Sky, not sure it is worth the money, but i like the low profile, and looked at several bowtie antennas. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Skip
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: Skip,

You are in a good location to receive signals from the antenna farms to your NW and SE but the challenge will be using a single fixed antenna. In your case, two antennas cannot be combined on a single coaxial downlead but an option is to use two fixed antennas, two downleads and an 'A-B' antenna switch.

Regarding the antenna, I think a Channel Master 4221-HD should be a good choice for both primary directions.

Before you get started, let others here chime in with their opinions.

Happy New Year,

Jim
 

guesswork

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#4
Fringe
thanks for the response. this maybe a stupid question, but can i combine the antenna coax at the base with a splitter and use the single feed into the house?

dk
thanks for your response also. With your recommendation is that just using a single antenna to catch both directions?

thanks
Skip
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#7
Fringe
thanks for the response. this maybe a stupid question, but can i combine the antenna coax at the base with a splitter and use the single feed into the house? ... thanks
Skip
Skip,

Simply put, in your situation you cannot efficiently combine two seperate or different UHF (same band) antennas because the signals antenna 'A' receives will be sent to your TV set and to the other antenna, and the signals antenna 'B' receives will be sent to your TV and to the other antenna. Thus, there will be at least a 50% signal level loss.

I'm sure when pointed in different directions the antenna SW suggested suffers from this as well, but the big advantage is being one integrated unit and not two antennas that have to be wrestled with.

Scroll down this page to Example One, which shows what you are attempting to do: Stacking multiple antennas

Jim
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#8
dk
thanks for your response also. With your recommendation is that just using a single antenna to catch both directions?
Yes, the CM-3010 is a bidirectional antenna with a beam angle of 45 degrees. It also works for both VHF and UHF. That is why I chose it over the bow-tie antennas. WKFK (rf 13) is probably strong enough to come in on the bow tie antennas, but WALA probably needs a VHF antenna.
 
#10
Combining antennas with a splitter is not recommended. The result is often excessive signal loss in both directions. I would be hesitant to recommend it do to the 60+ miles distance of stations to the east you will want all you can get from that direction. Yours is a situation where you won't really know until you try. I would try a single 4 bay antenna aimed to the east first. The signals from the NW might be strong enough to be received off the back side. Two antennas and a switch is by far the best solution. I'm keeping a close watch on my potential cross posts today. There is a very complete evaluation of the HDB8X on one of the other forums. The results were pretty much what I would expect when pointing separate directions. It would work great in lower mileage situations. Remote control antenna switches have been discontinued by Radio Shack, but are available from MCM electronics and other sources.
Remote Control A/B Switch: Two In, One Out | 32-4425 (324425) | Distributed By MCM
You have gotten some good advice here today.
Steve
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#11
... I would try a single 4 bay antenna aimed to the east first. The signals from the NW might be strong enough to be received off the back side. Two antennas and a switch is by far the best solution. Remote Control A/B Switch: Two In, One Out | 32-4425 (324425) | Distributed By MCM
You have gotten some good advice here today.
Steve
Regarding 4-bay antennas, do not bother trying an original Channel Master 4221 as the screen is quite efficient blocking signals from its rear. A Channel Master 4221-HD 'might' work for you.

If you find a cheap original CM-4221 on your local Craigslist, the screen can be removed easily but the gain will suffer which will require it to be mounted at least ten feet higher than your proposed 20 foot height above ground.

Jim
 

guesswork

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#13
First thanks for your help and the information i got on this site.

All right here is my update and results. i went with the HDB8X. i tried both suggested directions and also pointed in different directions. FOX WXXV was the challenge when i pointed 81, but i received so much more in that direction. at 81 i suffered on reception on my upstairs TV and could not get all of my local channels, i have a splitter outside before it goes in the house. At 310, i got all of my local stations but lost weather nation and other Mobile station except for WKRG. 310 worked upstairs and downstairs the best for all local stations. I went to Walmart and bought 25db amp and put it back to 81 and so far (1 day) all of the stations are coming in up and down stairs. i am thinking the only station that will still give trouble is WXXV(FOX). We have some thunderstorms starting today for a few days, i will see how well FOX stays with me. Worst case i have to put it back to 310, i know at this point i am being a little greedy.

is there a better amp or any other suggestions that someone might have?

Skip
 
#14
We don't know what amplifier you used. No I don't think you are getting greedy. With some time, patience, study, and experimentation you will get it worked out.
When set up, and installed correctly the RCA TVPRAMP1R is getting very good ratings.
 

guesswork

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#15
RF Steve
i used the following:
The GE Video Signal Amplifier improves signal strength for cable or antenna connections. This signal amplifier features a return path of -24dB.
GE Video Signal Amplifier:
Improves video signal strength
-24dB return path
Model# 33341
 
#16
I wouldn't have recommended the purchase or use of that type of amplifier in you application. If it's working for you great. If it solves reception problems don't change it. You asked for advice on a better amplifier I had no away of knowing what you had or what might be better. Walmart does sell the RCA TVPRAMP1R. It is getting very good reviews on the forums I read. Most of the problems reported with the TVPRAMP1R have been do to incorrect set up and installation. I would not have suggested an amplifier to solve your dual direction reception problem, but I can see how it could work.
Steve
 
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