reception problems

#1
I recently installed a Philips MANT940 antenna and reception is okay, but nothing great. Lots of channels come and go from time to time. Assuming part of my problem was due to a 4-way splitter, I purchased a Winegard AP 8275 amplifier. I installed it and got no signal at all. I checked to make sure it was installed properly and it was so I assumed it was a bad unit. Then, I went to Radio Shack and bought one. I can't remember the model, but the guys said it was what I needed. I installed it and it didn't work either. I was looking online and noticed it was UHF only. Is that the problem? Does anyone know why the amplifiers are working?
 

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#2
In two words, I can: "severe overload." Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but in attempting to solve a problem, you made it worse. Don't feel too bad -- you aren't the first to make this mistake, and I've got a tiny little hunch you won't be the last, either.

The MANT940 is a very small antenna that relies on a built-in amplifier. It does an OK job receiving UHF broadcasts simply because smaller antennas are better suited to stations at those frequencies. The 940 frequently stumbles on VHF broadcasts, though, due to the longer wavelength involved.

Adding a second amplifier is almost always a big mistake. Digital tuners overload much more quickly than analog tuners did. Overload isn't harmful to the electronics -- remove the source and it goes away -- but it frequently causes loss of at least one, and sometimes all, stations. When you added the second amp, either it or the tuner overloaded on every station.

The solution is a better antenna, not another amp, and we can advise you on which one might be a good choice if you would provide a ZIP code so that we can look up signal conditions in your general area. But be warned: By "a better antenna," it's going to mean something substantially larger than a MANT940!

(Ed. note: The guy at RS should have known about this issue and recommended a new antenna, not an amp. Shame on them! Return the amp for a refund. We'll recommend the good stuff you can only buy online.
 
#3
Thanks Don, that's great information. The zip code is 40057 and most of the channels are 30-40+ miles away. I was amazed at how many the MANT940 actually brought in, but it's just not stable enough. Is there an multi-directional antenna that will work in those distances. I would like to avoid a rotor if possible.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#4
Thanks Don, that's great information. The zip code is 40057 and most of the channels are 30-40+ miles away. I was amazed at how many the MANT940 actually brought in, but it's just not stable enough. Is there an multi-directional antenna that will work in those distances. I would like to avoid a rotor if possible.
You live in very hilly terrain. The zip code just can't get close enough to your real reception situation.

You can go here Google Maps Latitude, Longitude Popup and find your house and click on it. That will give you the exact location.

You can them Private Message us with that information so it doesn't appear publicly or go directly to TV Fool and enter the information.

The resulting page will have a link toward the top in bold letter you can share here without seeing your exact location to the public.

Also if you go to TVFool, be sure to put in the antenna height you intend to use outdoors. 15 to 20 ft is easy to achieve, higher than that gets more difficult.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#6
He will need a rotor to get all the channels or choose one of two directions. It's possible once we see his exact location, one direction may not be as good as the zip code version of the map.

The zip code also have moderately strong to weak stations even in the LOS list.
 
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