Rumor has it Wade Discontinuing Delhi Line of Consumer Antennas

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#1

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#3
Sad news indeed, but it's not the end of antenna manufacturing on this continent. CM notwithstanding, both Winegard and AntennaCraft still fabricate antennas out of factories in Burlington, Iowa.

A tad O.T.: Funny thing happened while attempting to verify whether Antennas Direct manufactures its antennas in St. Louis or elsewhere. As is usual with A-D, straight answers aren't easy to come by. So, I "Binged" the address at the bottom of their Web site (Screen grab: see Antennas_direct.jpg, attached), and it turns out to be the exact same street address as a self-storage facility (Screen grab: see Self-storage.jpg, also attached). Went to aerial view, and it sure looks like storage buildings only. Hmmm.....
 

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Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#4
Sad news indeed, but it's not the end of antenna manufacturing on this continent. CM notwithstanding, both Winegard and AntennaCraft still fabricate antennas out of factories in Burlington, Iowa.

A tad O.T.: Funny thing happened while attempting to verify whether Antennas Direct manufactures its antennas in St. Louis or elsewhere. As is usual with A-D, straight answers aren't easy to come by. So, I "Binged" the address at the bottom of their Web site (Screen grab: see Antennas_direct.jpg, attached), and it turns out to be the exact same street address as a self-storage facility (Screen grab: see Self-storage.jpg, also attached). Went to aerial view, and it sure looks like storage buildings only. Hmmm.....
No it's different. Antennas Direct shows 5th street while the storage facility shows fifth street. :dancing::boink: Just kidding Don, that's some good detective work there. :) You would think they would atleast disguise the address a little bit better with say, a PO box or something?
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#6
A tad O.T.: Funny thing happened while attempting to verify whether Antennas Direct manufactures its antennas in St. Louis or elsewhere. As is usual with A-D, straight answers aren't easy to come by. So, I "Binged" the address at the bottom of their Web site (Screen grab: see Antennas_direct.jpg, attached), and it turns out to be the exact same street address as a self-storage facility (Screen grab: see Self-storage.jpg, also attached). Went to aerial view, and it sure looks like storage buildings only. Hmmm.....
You are the man Sir Don!!!

That is the best OT post of the century in my book. One where I wish I could do a double or triple thank you.

I know every company out there uses marketing, but I always felt like they pushed it to the limit.

To me this is proof their marketing was even better than I thought.
 

Eureka

DTVUSA Member
#8
hehe you guys sure like to beat up Antennas Direct.
They deserve it for all their deception.

They brought their snake oil antenna bus through a nearby town peddling antennas like the clearstream convertible, which they claimed were "specifically tuned for DTV frequencies." People bought these antennas, only to find out after connecting them that they were UHF only, and couldn't receive VHF DTV channels in our area. By then, of course, the bus was long gone.
 

O-O

DTVUSA Member
#9
They deserve it for all their deception.

They brought their snake oil antenna bus through a nearby town peddling antennas like the clearstream convertible, which they claimed were "specifically tuned for DTV frequencies." People bought these antennas, only to find out after connecting them that they were UHF only, and couldn't receive VHF DTV channels in our area. By then, of course, the bus was long gone.
:bolt: lol
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#10
They deserve it for all their deception.

They brought their snake oil antenna bus through a nearby town peddling antennas like the clearstream convertible, which they claimed were "specifically tuned for DTV frequencies." People bought these antennas, only to find out after connecting them that they were UHF only, and couldn't receive VHF DTV channels in our area. By then, of course, the bus was long gone.
there were here too, I should have gone just to ask the hard questions, I missed a huge chance but then again, they would have dismissed me.

Funny thing is they were sponsored by a VHF/UHF (they have two channels) station here.
 

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#13
HTNut said:
hehe you guys sure like to beat up Antennas Direct.
Eureka said:
They brought their snake oil antenna bus through a nearby town peddling antennas like the clearstream convertible, which they claimed were "specifically tuned for DTV frequencies." People bought these antennas, only to find out after connecting them that they were UHF only, and couldn't receive VHF DTV channels in our area. By then, of course, the bus was long gone.
Nothing that more marketing can't fix: If you overpaid for a Clearstream 1, 2 or 4, then you're a juicy target for a Clearstream 5 and their combiner for the low, low price of $125 or so. No other company out there has the testicular fortitude necessary to ask north of $200 for medium-gain antenna equipment capable of receiving all channels. So, yeah, they deserve every lash of the rhetorical whip they get, and then some.
 

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#17
Miniaturization has often commanded higher prices, though.
Absolutely, but the phenomenon you describe is at best a temporary windfall for the innovator. Pricing in the electronics industry as a whole has been deflationary going back decades.

Recent example: The first iPhones cost $600. Today you can get twice the cell phone for a third of the cost.

Intermediate example: Floppy-based desktop PCs cost a couple thousand dollars 25 years ago. Entry-level PCs today cost a few hundred bucks and are many orders of magnitude more powerful in terms of memory, processing speed and storage capacity. Not only that, you can carry it and use it practically anywhere. That simply wasn't possible in 1984.

"Dark ages" example: People paid $500 to get their hands on a color TV in the mid-60s -- equivalent to more than $3,300 today. Four years ago, the last analog-only CRT receivers with similar viewing areas went for $300 or less.
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#18
Absolutely, but the phenomenon you describe is at best a temporary windfall for the innovator. Pricing in the electronics industry as a whole has been deflationary going back decades.

Recent example: The first iPhones cost $600. Today you can get twice the cell phone for a third of the cost.
It's crazy to think my iPhone is probably more powerful, better graphics, and a better communicator than my old Tandy PC from 1988. and it operates off of a battery for a couple of days with normal usage. :)
 

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#19
It's crazy to think my iPhone is probably more powerful, better graphics, and a better communicator than my old Tandy PC from 1988.
Another shocker: As we celebrate the 40th anniversary of the first moon walk this weekend, please remember that Apollo 11's Lunar Excursion Module had less computing power aboard than either 1980s-era floppy PCs, or the Macintoshes that competed with them.

Moore's Law: It's a wonderful thing.
 
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