Rundown- What is HDTV/DTV/CRT?

#1
Well Duh?!,

Should we need the RUNDOWN here's a few specs.

With HDTV, you can play movies in their original widescreen format. The first High Definition Television hit the market in 1998.
For sports fans, and movie goers this was like tasting heaven.

We are use to watching what you call CRT or Cathode Ray Tube- display around 480 visible lines of pixels.

•Analog pictures are interlaced -- a CRT's electron gun paints only half the lines for each pass down the screen.
On some TVs, interlacing makes the picture flicker.
•Converting video to analog format lowers its quality.

U.S broadcasting is changing and looking for the next (GREEN Technology) and digital television (DTV) has paved the way. A digital signal transmits the information for video and sound as ones and zeros instead of as a wave. For over-the-air broadcasting, DTV will generally use the UHF portion of the radio spectrum with a 6 MHz bandwidth, just like analog TV signals do so seems simple enough huh?.

DTV has several advantages:
•The picture, even when displayed on a small TV, is better quality.
•A digital signal can support a higher resolution, so the picture will still look good when shown on a larger TV screen.
•The video can be progressive rather than interlaced -- the screen shows the entire picture for every frame instead of every other line of pixels.
•TV stations can broadcast several signals using the same bandwidth. This is called multicasting.
•If broadcasters choose to, they can include interactive content or additional information with the DTV signal.
•It can support high-definition (HDTV) broadcasts.

DTV also has one big disadvantage, Analog TVs can't decode and display digital signals. When analog broadcasting ends, you'll only be able to watch TV on your trusty old set if you have cable or satellite service transmitting analog signals or if you have a set-top digital converter.

This brings us to the first big misconception about HDTV. Some people believe that the United States is switching to HDTV -- that all they'll need for HDTV is a new TV and that they'll automatically have HDTV when analog service ends. Unfortunately, none of this is true.

HDTV is just one part of the DTV transition. HDTV is simply the highest of all the DTV standards. But whether you see a high-definition picture and hear the accompanying Dolby Digital® sound depends on two things. First, the station has to be broadcasting a high-definition signal. Second, you have to have the right equipment to receive and view it.

So I hope this starter rundown helps.
 
#2
DTV also has one big disadvantage, Analog TVs can't decode and display digital signals. When analog broadcasting ends, you'll only be able to watch TV on your trusty old set if you have cable or satellite service transmitting analog signals or if you have a set-top digital converter.
I know some digital to analog converter boxes lack analog "passthrough." (So you need a splitter or switch for a direct antenna-TV connection.) But are there really lots of digital TVs being sold without analog tuning capability? I was under the impression it's just a different rendering or "decoding" pattern, so requiring a little extra ROM for the regular rendering program (literally less than a penny, after the programmer's salary is spread out over thousands of units), or alternately an extra chip.

I'm not trying to be critical, I really don't know whether manufacturers are getting that cheap. I do know my unsmart 2009 $60 Walmart TV pretty much does it all: analog, digital, cable and QAM.

This brings us to the first big misconception about HDTV. Some people believe that the United States is switching to HDTV -- that all they'll need for HDTV is a new TV and that they'll automatically have HDTV when analog service ends. Unfortunately, none of this is true.
Not sure I follow. Nice "Rundown" starter, though. :thumb:

Rick
 
#4
Well, there may come a day when it makes no sense for TVs to include analog rendering. I just had the date for the absolute FCC cutoff for analog TV. I think it was Sept. 2015. But they still want to sell those sets in other parts of the world, so might be a decade or more before we see the last of the analog remote button.

People in mountainous regions will really miss analog translators. They get a snowy picture, but at least they get some content. But it seems the FCC is biased against broadcast TV in general. They keep selling swaths of bandwidth to "more advanced" types of signal.

Rick
 
#6
Wow that's great information... You know there will always be someone with an old t.v box lying around lol...I had no idea the FCC sold bandwidth to more advanced company...
One of the things I learned by reading these forums. :thumb: Here's a google search that brings up several threads:
site:dtvusaforum.com FCC bandwidth auction

Or like this:
site:dtvusaforum.com FCC Shapiro

Rick
 
Top