Say goodbye to channels 38 to 51

Tim58hsv

DTVUSA Member
#1
The latest spectrum auction is over and while the wireless industry didn't get as much of the OTA spectrum as they hoped, they did manage to come up with enough cash to purchase channels 38 thru 51. What this means is any TV stations that air on channels 38 to 51 will have have to move somewhere else on the spectrum or go off the air.

Sucks but it's not as bad as it sounds because a new over the air broadcast standard is on the horizon. What we currently use now is called ATSC 1.0 and this will start being replaced (as early as 2018) by ATSC 3.0 and just like when OTA converted from analog to digital, ATSC 3.0 will has some good and some bad (mostly good in my opinion) that comes along with it.

The bad:
You'll need to purchase an ATSC 3.0 converter box or an ATSC 3.0 capable TV set and unfortunately the government won't be helping to pay for the converter boxes as they did with the analog to digital switch.

That's all the bad I can think of right now.

The good:
Better reception. Supposedly indoor antennas will be able to pick TV signals from further away.
4K ultra image quality.
Surround sound.
Main channels will be able to add a lot more sub channels with less degrading of image quality. The Antennas Direct link below claims each main channel could have 100 subchannels but comments from another forum say "No way."

Link below for: ATSC 3.0, in Layman’s Terms
http://www.antennasdirect.com/blog/atsc-3-0-laymans-terms/?cjid=6155355
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
Channel 37 is also being retired (?). Its 6 MHz spectrum may become an unused gap between the remaining UHF television band and wireless devices. There is talk of eliminating channels 36 and possibly channel 35 if OTA television interferes with "far more important" communications such as cellphone selfie pictures.
 
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Tim58hsv

DTVUSA Member
#3
Channel 37 has never been used by TV stations since that particular channel is used for radio astronomy. Are you saying the radio astronomy frequency is being (or maybe already has been) moved too?
 
#4
As far as I know channel 37 has never been used for television broadcast in this country. As it was set aside for radio astronomy many years ago.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_37
I hate to see the loss of OTA broadcast channels.
While the local PBS affiliate has publicly stated that there operations throughout the state will not be affected by the changes in allotted spectrum. They currently have 2 local translators that are above channel 37. With a repeat of their main signal on channel 40 to cover outlying areas, and FNX network on channel 38. I would hope that they have a solution as there has already been a significant loss of rural broadcast television coverage in this valley.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
I tried to upload a spectrum chart and discovered the Forum has a glitch that won't currently allow me to add to my albums.

It indicates the highest UHF TV channel will be 36, up to 608 MHz. On this chart, Channel 37 is not indicated to remain for radio astronomy (608 to 614 MHz) but it may. Next is "Guardband" -- 2 MHz wide: 614 to 616 MHz is now allocated to short range (low power) wireless microphones and 616 to 617 MHz will be unused to avoid interference with higher "Wireless" frequencies.

My local ABC, NBC, CBS, Telemundo and several independents all must move or go dark.

Jim
 
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Tim58hsv

DTVUSA Member
#6
Got a link here that will maybe show at least some of the channel changes that will happen in each market once channels 38 to 51 are taken away from the TV broadcasters.

Using the Dayton, Ohio market as an example, WHIO channel 7, which currently airs on real channel 41, will be moving to real channel 33 after channels 38 to 51 are gone.

Link...
https://www.nab.org/repacking/clearinghouse.asp

Oh yea, some channels below 38 will have to move too in order to allow for enough frequency space (guardband) between each channel.
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#7
:thumb: Tim

That is a terrific find. Four of my local channels participated and assuming the FCC and Canadian Authorities agree, we will still have free TV. Thanks!

Jim
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#8
This is going to be interesting. KTVD is moving to channel 31, but KBDI's Colorado Springs translator is currently on 31. Oh great!?! And, why are stations moving up in the spectrum? KDVR moving from 32-36? KTVD moving from 19-31? KTFD moving from 15 to 32? What is up with that?

It may be that all the co-located stations (Lookout Mountain) are moving to adjacent channels. (KTVD 31, KTFD 32, KWGN 34, KCNC 35, KDVR 36) Maybe KRMA will move to 33. But, why would you move both KTFD and KDVR? Why wouldn't you just move KTFD to 36 and leave KDVR at 32? That doesn't make sense to me. I though the goal was to move the smallest number of stations.
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#9
In my area, a Network station is taking over an Independent stations channel and the Independent is moving to a new channel. I suspect it has to do with maintain existing coverage areas without creating interference in distant locations. As an example, the full-power Network stations in Seattle reach into British Columbia, Canada, but BC relies on scores of low-power Community translators which limits the channel choices available for the Seattle stations. Interference in the distance can be resolved via transmitter antenna design or reducing transmitter power, but either or both would reduce coverage area and make their signal less valuable to advertisers.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#10
I wonder if Colorado Springs stations will be grouped in the 20's. KXRM is on 22, KRDO on 24, and KXTU on 20. KOAA may end up as a full power on 30. KKTV has to go somewhere. I was thinking they might move back to 10. I hope that KWHS finds a channel and has the funds to move. Sure need my COZI!!!
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#11
FCC Expands Channel Sharing

The ability to channel-share is an important component of the FCC’s incentive auction, mandated by Congress in 2012, which provides a voluntary opportunity for full-power and Class A TV stations to relinquish their spectrum and share a channel with another full-power or Class A broadcaster in exchange for a part of the proceeds from a related mobile wireless auction.

Separately, the commission in 2015 extended channel sharing to low-power television and TV translator stations to help stations displaced by the incentive auction stay on the air.

Today’s order permits TV stations with an auction-related channel sharing agreement (CSA) to continue channel sharing by entering into a new CSA in the event that their existing agreement ends. This enables stations to continue providing service to their viewers. The new rules also permit Class A stations to channel share outside of the auction context.

Additionally, all LPTV and TV translator stations are now able to share a channel with a full-power or Class A station. This flexibility gives LPTV and TV translator stations that are displaced by the auction repacking process more options for continuing to operate. It also may reduce construction and operating costs for LPTV and TV translator stations, many of which have limited resources, are minority-owned, or provide programming to underserved audiences.
Read More: http://www.tvnewscheck.com/article/102594/fcc-expands-channel-sharing-opportunities
 
#15
I've found some information I'd like to share.
LPTV digital stations and, translators can continue to operate indefinitely on channel 38-51 until told that a wireless company will begin operations are they will cause interference. Paragraph 60 of this document.
https://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-announces-results-worlds-first-broadcast-incentive-auction-0
The NAB has a very good video on YouTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l03Hff97hqE&feature=share
At least one company is offering some additional compensation to PBS.
http://apts.org/news/press-release/...serve-access-public-television-millions-rural
I hope the links I posted work.
 

musiclvr56

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#17
In Boston 44-3 Create TV, a PBS channel is the only channel I watch that is between 38-51. I guess I am not technically savvy because I don't understand this post that well-you mentioned "the bad"-I don't understand "You'll need to purchase an ATSC 3.0 converter box or an ATSC 3.0 capable TV set". I feel embarrassed that I don't understand this-can this be explained in layman's terms? Thanks!
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#18
Musiclvr,

Back in the analog TV days, most stations transmitted on real channels 2 through 13. When they made the transition to digital broadcasting, many channels moved to UHF channels 14 though 51, but to reduce confusion, modern TV tuners are designed display the stations original channel numbers regardless of the actual or real channel they are currently using to broadcast. As an (invented) example ... IF you had an analog channel 7 and they moved their real channel to channel 51, your tuner continued to display the original or "legacy" channel 7.

What is changing (within two years) are some of the current real broadcasting channels -- and back to my example above: Your analog 7, changed to digital 51 but displayed as 7. Now, it will move its real channel to channel 30 but if will continue to display as 7. However, one station in your area, WGBH- UHF real channel 19 is moving to (real channel) low-band VHF-5 and if you currently receive it, it will (probably) require an entirely different type of antenna to continue receiving that station.

In the Boston area at least 12 stations will be changing their actual 'real' transmitting channels and the list can be found here under DMA-9: https://www.nab.org/repacking/clearinghouse.asp Please take a look at the list and/or plug in any other channel call signs you currently watch to determine if they are changing channels, what channels are moving and/or if they have decided to end television service. I hope this helps.

Jim
 
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Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#19
Follow the money.

Cell phone companies are buying spectrum wherever they can find it or find a bribable official that will take it away from the rest of us.

They are also selling the so called "white" space in cities, channels that are unused but still allocated to OTA broadcast - the demand for cell phone spectrum is so high they will soon be leasing tin cans connected with string for more spectrum.
 
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