'Secret Millionaire' Debuts with Multi-Millionaire Artist Scott Jacobs

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#1
A new season of ABC's Secret Millionaire began Sunday evening, and it was met with very soft ratings numbers, meaning not a whole lot of people tuned in to watch the show. In fact, it had a 1.5 rating among adults 18-49, which is the key demographic that networks and sponsors look at. It is a shame really because I find the show to be enlightening, heartwarming, and educational.

View attachment 1755 The premise of Secret Millionaire is that some wealthy person decides to move in to a raunchy or otherwise rundown neighborhood for a week and seek out charities or groups that promote good things or help the low income or homeless people in the community. At the end of the week, the millionaire reveals him or herself to the people they've met and make a donation.

The donation amounts are up to the millionaire. I have to admit that sometimes I don't think too much of the paltry sum donated. If you're a millionaire, and you are doing this show, then you should be prepared to make some hefty gifts. I have seen some, however, give out what I just do not think is much, while other millionaires have stunned me with their generosity. Of course, I am sure these are all tax write-offs, but regardless, a lot of people are being helped.

The season premier was the first one that featured a father and daughter. Artist Scott Jacobs took one of his daughters along for the adventure. By her own admission, Alexa Jacobs had no sense of the value of the dollar, not to mention she'd never cleaned a toilet before. On her first day out, she was in tears. What she spent without thought for getting her nails done was a week's meals for someone she'd met. It was a wake up call for her.

Jacobs himself admitted he had never done anything service oriented and had no clue life was as bad as what he saw during the experience.

I hope the Jacobs family continues to widen their horizons, including Alexa perhaps evolving into a more humanitarian type of young lady. She set the tone for this episode by not acting like a diva princess, but by opening herself up to the fact that she'd been living in a cocoon of sorts.

People might criticize this type of show, but what is really important is that people with hardly anything are being helped. I hope the ratings pick up so that more in need can luck out by meeting other secret millionaires.
 
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Guest

Guest
#2
I am impressed and happy that Scott J. and his daughter took on giving of themselves, and their money to those in need. Very impressed. However, I am bothered that the amount of the checks were paultry compared to the amount of money he has. Does he plan to tithe or continue to spread his blessings after the show? Is he going to set up a foundation or maybe he already has one. Like I said, I hate to sound like I am critizing, because I do admire him and his daughter. I just think that if I had that much money I would give more than $20,000 and $2,500 to a kid that is taking care of his family. Perhaps Scott J. was going to keep in touch with the young talented glass blower? Anyway, just wondering......
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#3
Yeah, I often feel that way. In the history of the show, I think there have been a couple of the millionaires who really gave what I consider to be "a lot" considering their wealth. When I see some of these others handing out what I feel are "tiny" checks, it does make me wonder. Last weeks show had the two co-owners of a fitness club. They did pretty good with the one group, actually funding a franchise for them, but then for the limbs group, knowing there were 200 people on a waiting list, I was expecting them to handle the list. They gave $50,000. Huh? Yes, they helped 50 people. That's great. But those two are so wealthy that I wonder why they didn't give $200,000 to clear the waiting list.
 
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Guest

Guest
#4
The health club guys donated 100,000 to the limb organization. While I do agree that some of the donations were minimal, I am thankful we have wealthy people who are willing to get out there and find organizations in need of assistance. $2500 may not be a lot to us, but it's a lot to someone who has nothing. I only wish our government would help our own more instead of funding our tax dollars to other countries.
 
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