Super HD, (2k & 4k) the Future?

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#1
Home Theatre is assured to follow Hollywood into Super HD territory. In fact high end home theatres alread use professional LCD movie theatre projectors in 2k (and probably 4k).

What's it all mean? The endless shuffling of bigger, smaller, better, faster, more, higher resolutinon, faster scan rates....blah blah blah.

Is HD enough? Do we really need Super HD in small home entertainment setups?

What say you?


The Future of 'Super HD' Scanning Formats

by Randy Hoffner, 07.07.2009

We have taken a look at HDTV and other high-resolution scanning formats. Now let's look at a "Super HD" scanning format, and some others that are being considered by SMPTE for standardization. These won't be broadcast or put on cable any time soon, but those in front of SMPTE are intended to be used in digital cinema capture.

In the world of HDTV scanning formats, the highest spatial resolution is delivered by 1920x1080, which is commonly broadcast as 1080i/29.97 frames per second, and is commonly used for film-to-video transfer and HD camera capture as 1080p/24 fps. For film and digital cinema applications, we get into so-called 2K and 4K resolutions, which are currently file-based.


continued...

The Future of 'Super HD' Scanning Formats, by Randy Hoffner
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#2
I'm not sure about resolution higher than 1080i or 1080p, but I would like to see 60fps or higher. It looks so fluid when I'm getting that on a few of my PC games.
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#3
I think the higher rezs are good for big screens, I was noticing the screen door effect at the Regal Cinema 18 the other day. Yuk!

Last year, Gateway apparently had a 2k monitor out. Is that pretty common?



I agree totally with the higher frame rate.
 
#4
Home Theatre is assured to follow Hollywood into Super HD territory. In fact high end home theatres alread use professional LCD movie theatre projectors in 2k (and probably 4k).

What's it all mean? The endless shuffling of bigger, smaller, better, faster, more, higher resolutinon, faster scan rates....blah blah blah.

Is HD enough? Do we really need Super HD in small home entertainment setups?

What say you?
For bigger screens, I'm all game for it. It wasn't mentioned, but I can't imagine that OTA or cable/satellite would grab a hold of the idea though. Too much bandwidth.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#5
I am not sure of the biological physics involved but at some point there has to be a limit where more resolution is not perceivable by the human eye. Even NTSC depending on the person can display 2 to 3 times the number of colors most people can see.
 
#6
I am not sure of the biological physics involved but at some point there has to be a limit where more resolution is not perceivable by the human eye. Even NTSC depending on the person can display 2 to 3 times the number of colors most people can see.
With my eyes, I can't distinguish the difference between 1080i and 780p on a 47" screen. :)
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#7
With my eyes, I can't distinguish the difference between 1080i and 780p on a 47" screen. :)
I can see 720p compared to 1080i on my 32 inch but it's not much. I have two PBS stations. One is 1080i, the other 720p, so it makes a great comparison. I actually like the 720p better because it does break into blocks when there is a lot of motion on the screen. I would rather see "HD Lite" compared to seeing stuff break into blocks.
 
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