Thank you all for a successful installation!

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
Mike,

That's a terrific photo-journal :thumb:

Have you spoken with your neighbors who also have antennas to see how many FREE channels they are receiving?

Jim
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#3
Interesting, Aussie chimney mounts are usually done with wire, not with metal banding. A bit of angle is placed at every corner to protect the bricks/masonry. Easier to tighten (just use a turnbuckle - as you would for guy wiring).

If I could offer any advice it would be to find a way of securing the balun (with a cable tie or some tape). Otherwise it will blow around in the wind and snap the wires running to the driver element.
 

ENIGMACODE

DTVUSA Member
#4
"If I could offer any advice it would be to find a way of securing the balun (with a cable tie or some tape). Otherwise it will blow around in the wind and snap the wires running to the driver element."

Are you referring to the RG6 Coax? If so, I've already cable tied, taped, and strapped it to the masonry all the way down.

The Twin Lead Transformer is also strapped/held with nylon, (which comes pre-attached to the boom).

Mike
 
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dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#6
If I could offer any advice it would be to find a way of securing the balun (with a cable tie or some tape). Otherwise it will blow around in the wind and snap the wires running to the driver element.
That would be "best practice", but I've seen 30 year old installations where the cable hung from the balun that still worked. He does have some "stress relief." If he has a ladder tall enough it might be a good idea, but if he has to take it down, might not be worth the work.:p
 

ENIGMACODE

DTVUSA Member
#9
Hi AGAIN Jim :)

"and better HD than cable or satellite"

That was my next question: I'm assuming as long as the TV is HD capable, and the signal is broadcast in HD, I should be receiving an HD picture? Like for example a major news station? And BTW, I'm using the insignia model we talked about here. I also have a Zenith but it doesn't have the analog pass thru.

I'm about to set up my main TV in the living room with the Zenith converter. That TV is HD capable, 42". Will need to cut loose the HDMI connector, and the Comcast DVR box. Will need to SIMPLIFY the audio and video connections. Will have to figure out where/how to use those primitive analog RCA & RF type connections with regard to my HDMI ready TV and FM/Receiver/Amplifier which has everything routed to it currently.

Any comments?

You guys have been great!

The neighbors are just used to paying $200 or more a month. They wouldn't know what to do with those old antennas :) This gives me an appreciated opportunity to save money as I prepare for Medicare next summer.

Mike
 
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nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#10
Sounds like a good opportunity to make a little money if you are that way inclined.

One month equals your costs covered already. Two months is your costs plus a generous profit. Free TV for them. Everyone wins!
 
#11
I'm about to set up my main TV in the living room with the Zenith converter. That TV is HD capable, 42". Will need to cut loose the HDMI connector, and the Comcast DVR box. Will need to SIMPLIFY the audio and video connections. Will have to figure out where/how to use these primitive analog RCA & RF type connections with regard to my HDMI ready TV and FM/Receiver/Amplifier which has everything routed to it currently.

Any comments?

You guys have been great!
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#12
Is your TV in the living room "HDTV ready"? Or, is it a HDTV? "HDTV ready" TVs didn't have digital tuners, but HDTVs do, and therefore don't need converter boxes. If your television is a true HDTV, just plug the cable into the TV RF input, go into the menu, change the input to "air" or "antenna" and scan for channels. If your TV is only "HD ready" you will need a converter that has HD output to get real HD. The Insignias and Zeniths only have SD outputs. You would need a Channel Master CM-7001, or, if you could find one, a CM-7000pal DVR.
 
#13
Hey There DK

Yes the 42" Panasonic is definitely HD with a VHF/UHF tuner. That solves the RF input - suppose the bulit-in tuner will 'auto search', (Just like the Digital Boxes?)

For the audio, I guess I'll leave the current connections to the sound system - hate to interfere with that stuff - it took me forever to get it right.

Mike
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#14
Yes the 42" Panasonic is definitely HD with a VHF/UHF tuner. That solves the RF input - suppose the bulit-in tuner will 'auto search', (Just like the Digital Boxes?)
Yes, it will "auto search" like the digital converter boxes. It should be in the "set up" section of "menu." Make sure you're set to "air" or "antenna" depending on the model of the TV (not cable) before doing the scan.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#16
Mike,

In my area we are being perpetually hammered with a "FREE HD for life" offer from DishTV. I think it is a bit misleading (and expensive) compared to your FREE 43 channels, eh? Congratulations!

Jim
 

Tim58hsv

DTVUSA Member
#17
I'm using the insignia model we talked about here. I also have a Zenith but it doesn't have the analog pass thru.
Mike
Congratulations, Mike! You're getting a lot of free tv and free is always good.

I just wanted to add that both the Insignia and Zenith converter boxes have analog pass thru, in fact they're the exact same converter box and the remotes are interchangeable on each. The Zenith boxes with the Insignia label on them were sold by the Best Buy stores. All the other retailers just called them "Zenith" but they are the exact same converter box.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#19
Hey dk

UNBELIEVABLE!

CRISP CLEAR HD ALL THE WAY - Never thought for the life of me, that you could actually get HD for FREE?

WOW!
Yes, and it isn't the watered down HD the cable and satellite companies pass out to paying customers who don't know any better. ;)

Little secret... In most cases the satellite companies pick up the local stations using an antenna before recompressing it and bouncing it off their "bird." The cable companies often have a trunk line that runs past the studios, but they generally recompress the signal to save bandwidth so they can have room for "the flute channel" and all the swamp people and pawn shop shows. The best HD for local channels is always direct from the broadcast towers.
 

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