Think we'll ever see a return to more scripted shows?

#1
To be perfectly honest, the first decade of the new millenium has still been very much the decade of reality shows, with popular programs like Survivor creating a massive tidal wave, with many further reality shows to follow, and many fewer scripted television shows on TV.

As somebody who has never liked Reality television much, I keep hoping for a return to scripted shows. Do you ever see reality shows dying out, or at least shrinking in numbers?
 

BCF68

DTVUSA Member
#2
Nope. Reality shows are cheaper to make. And as long as viewers insit on illegally downloading shows from the internet commerical free then don't expect the networks to invest heavily in any show.
 
#4
There are far better ways to make money than producing scripted television programming.
Such as...?

I am assuming that you mean something other than reality television shows of course, but I would still like some examples for things that you would rather see more of instead of scripted television.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#5
There are far better ways to make money than producing scripted television programming.
Such as...? I am assuming that you mean something other than reality television shows of course,
Why would you assume "something other than reality television shows"? I don't think you really believe what you seem to be saying there. I think you know that what BCF68 said is absolutely true, and that your statement, here, with regard to reality television, is really quite off-the-mark.

Beyond that, there are myriad uses for capital that may end up, especially given the way things are going, being better ways to make money than producing scripted television programming: Feature films, direct-to-video, sports teams, theme parks, cruise ships -- and that's just if you limit your investments to the leisure consumer marketplace.

There are far better ways to make money than producing scripted television programming.
... I would still like some examples for things that you would rather see more of instead of scripted television.
Y'know, maybe the issue here is that you perhaps didn't read the message you replied to. Just as a test: Do you see, now, how your comment has absolutely nothing to do with the message you replied to?
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#6
I hope we get back to scripted, but it's not going to happen until or unless the economy improves. The difference in production costs (including residuals) is huge.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#7
The economy has improved, actually. Here in Massachusetts, for example, we are actually no longer in recession, and our economy is showing significant growth. I don't think, though, that an improving economy is going to make the difference. People are spreading their money out, over far more discretionary expenses than ever before. The more choices there are, the fewer people underwrite the costs of each individual choice, and therefore the less money there is to produce each individual choice. And I think scripted television will be harder hit than most any other diversion, since it is also now becoming subject to a lot of negative revenue pressures. Bad timing that both of these things are happening at the same time, because it'll end up resulting in a sharper and more durable decline in scripted television than otherwise.
 
#8
I fully understand that reality television shows are a lot cheaper to make than scripted television, but there are plenty of people (such as myself for instance) that do not like it, and they can repackage reality programs anyway that they want, and you are still going to have a good amount of folks who cannot get into it.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#9
I fully understand that reality television shows are a lot cheaper to make than scripted television,
That's not the point we were making. How much it costs to make something, by itself, is utterly irrelevant in business. What matters is how much profit making it affords the producer. And the point we were making was that increasingly other alternatives (like reality television) that are exceeding scripted programming in terms of how much profit making that alternative affords the producer. Reality television does seem to be a high-flier, today; maybe that will continue, maybe not; but there are other alternatives that may also provide superior returns.

Remember the basic axiom: Every dollar spent always competes with every other way that dollar could be spent instead.

but there are plenty of people (such as myself for instance) that do not like it, and they can repackage reality programs anyway that they want, and you are still going to have a good amount of folks who cannot get into it.
Yes, true, but that isn't the issue, and in reality, isn't necessarily significant: "Plenty of people" doesn't mean that it is enough people, spending enough money, to warrant that those who produce entertainment would necessarily be motivated to satisfy.
 

Orrymain

, Blogger: Orry's Orations
#10
It's the licensing costs for scripted, especially the longer it's been around. The salaries go up; the residuals go up. Do reality and salaries are nil for the most part and there are no residuals. That's just a couple of examples.

Networks don't care about the individual. Jay Leno got the Tonight Show back not because of viewer demand but because of affiliate demand aka: money. Show biz is cruel.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#11
Life is cruel. While individual employers may be nice people, generally Americans punish companies that "do the right thing" at the expense of profit (i.e., The Wallace Company), while they reward companies that "do the wrong thing" in the interest of profit (i.e., Wal-Mart).
 
Top