Question: Trees blocking my OTA path

8a31

DTVUSA Rookie
#1
I live in the Cincinnati Area which has more than enough stations to watch except I have trees in my way. I bought a flat indoor antenna and placed it in the attic. I picked up 13 channels. I removed that and put a shark fin style RCA antenna on the roof. It is aprox. 25 ft from the ground. Its just above all of the roof lines in my area but no matter where I place the antenna, to pick up Cincinnati stations it has to travel through 2 maple trees and it skims above the top of power lines at the street.

The RCA went from 39 channels (cincy and Dayton)to 15 (no dayton) for some unknown reason. It also breaks up bad with the weather and I am unable to watch from a tower 9 miles away. I am using the existing cable lines in the house because I cut the cord and switched to Roku. I would like to pick up both cities channels again but I know when the leaves come in Im going to have issues.

I have looked at Omni-directionals such as the Channel Master CM3000AR and Cm3000HD but dont know if they will pull the signal through the trees. I also looked at the Solid Signal Xtreme Signal HDB8X but it seems like overkill for my area. Any help would be appreciated.

My TVFool report
 
#2
I would consider trying a 4 bay bow tie type antenna with reflector removed. I have watched the assembly video and HDB4X look like it could be a good candidate for the job. An Antennas Direct C2-V with the reflector screen removed also comes to mind. I'm not certain of what problems one might run into when modifying the antennas. I've done quite well in a similar multi directional situation with a 4 bay no reflector, and more recently a 2 bay with no reflector. While I have no trees TV fool shows my UHF signals to be from 22.2 NM to 34.2 NM with a 204 degree separation between transmitter sites. The VHF signals here are strong enough to be received with 2 and 4 bay antennas I've been using.
With a change in reception I would think something has gone wrong with the coax or antenna.
There are very few situations where an omni-directional is the right choice.
 
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#3
Not certain what a shark fin style RCA antenna is. My guess is the RCA ANT700R, or ANT700F. If that's the case it is an amplified antenna. You could have a problem with power supply failure, amplifier failure, or amplifier over load from nearby strong signals. While maple trees do attenuate signal, more in the summer than winter. You have very strong nearby signals making amplifier overload a very real possibility. I would not recommend an amplified antenna at your location.
 
#5
@ProjectSHO89,
I once lived in a neighborhood where there was a tree located in an easement blocking my neighbor's line of site...he was afraid of getting fined by pulling out the chainsaw...
Before the Alabama fan got in trouble for taking out the Auburn trees:
Harvey Updyke sentenced to 3 years for Auburn tree poisoning - ESPN

He went there...of course by the time the tree got "sick"...the neighbor moved, and the rest of us had to deal with the dead tree!
 
G

Guest

Guest
#6
Not certain what a shark fin style RCA antenna is. My guess is the RCA ANT700R, or ANT700F. If that's the case it is an amplified antenna. You could have a problem with power supply failure, amplifier failure, or amplifier over load from nearby strong signals. While maple trees do attenuate signal, more in the summer than winter. You have very strong nearby signals making amplifier overload a very real possibility. I would not recommend an amplified antenna at your location.
Its the ANT700R. I have had to put an inline Amp at the TV just to get Cincinnati locals. Without an amp I get 4-5 channels. I know what your saying is true. I just dont understand why without the amp I loose signal even more .
 
#7
:welcome: 8a31. Sorry I didn't see this thread earlier.

I live in the Cincinnati Area which has more than enough stations to watch except I have trees in my way. I bought a flat indoor antenna and placed it in the attic. I picked up 13 channels. I removed that and put a shark fin style RCA antenna on the roof.
Sorry to say, the ANT700R isn't much improvement over the indoor jobber. Neither of those gets recommended on this site much at all.

It is aprox. 25 ft from the ground. Its just above all of the roof lines in my area
That's good.

but no matter where I place the antenna, to pick up Cincinnati stations it has to travel through 2 maple trees and it skims above the top of power lines at the street.
Two maple trees shouldn't be a huge problem with the strong signals I see in your TVF Report. The power lines would only cause a problem if they are arcing or malfunctioning somehow. If that proves to be the case, please call the electric company.

The RCA went from 39 channels (cincy and Dayton)to 15 (no dayton) for some unknown reason.
If you remove power from the amplifier, it becomes a bottleneck for the RF signal. It's unusual to get any stations when you do that with an "inline" amplifier, which is what you have. The amplifier is actually inside the plastic housing of the antenna itself. The "amplifier inserter" (I think they call it) is what we normally call a "power inserter." It sends DC power up the coax to the amplifier in the antenna without causing RF interference. But it has to be plugged in at all times.

It also breaks up bad with the weather and I am unable to watch from a tower 9 miles away. I am using the existing cable lines in the house because I cut the cord and switched to Roku. I would like to pick up both cities channels again but I know when the leaves come in Im going to have issues.
I think if you get a real antenna up there, there's a good chance you can do that.

I have looked at Omni-directionals such as the Channel Master CM3000AR and Cm3000HD but dont know if they will pull the signal through the trees.
Either one should be an improvement, but omnidirectional antennas are limited to 5 dBi in any direction. You don't need an omni, you need two directional antennas or one bidirectional antenna.

I also looked at the Solid Signal Xtreme Signal HDB8X but it seems like overkill for my area.
Agreed! Steve had a good idea with the HDB4X. You can get the same antenna direct from MCM and save a few bucks:
Stellar Labs HDTV 60 Mile Fringe Bowtie Television Antenna | 30-2425 (302425) | Stellar Labs

You could try it with and without the reflector to see which works best. If you put it on, aim it north-north-east, hoping to get the south-west stations off the backside. If the south-west stations don't come in that way, take off the reflector. If that doesn't work, put reflector back on and aim it south-west. That will get you those super strong SW stations anyhow. Then we can talk about adding a second antenna pointed NNE.

Another possibility is an RCA ANT751R. I mention that because you have one high VHF station WKBC RF12, and the 4 bay bowtie isn't technically a VHF antenna. However, WKBC is very strong, and if it wimps out, you still have WHIO for CBS coming from the other direction.

The Bowtie gives you more options to try in your bidirectional quandary. :becky: And it's definitely stronger than the ANT751R for UHF. Stronger also than any of those plastic ripoffs. Try it with no amplifier to one receiver. If you have to split two or three ways, you might add an amplifier later.

- PLEASE LET US KNOW HOW IT GOES -

Rick
 
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