Two Antenna Help.

uceddiec

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
I have the Phillips outdoor antenna that looks like a book and is UHF. I just ordered the Winegard SS3000 and plan on running both into a combiner "cant remember what its called but it is cheap" anyways...I am going to use one indoor and one outdoor to get the best combines signal into one cable. Is there any ohm issue or anything I am missing from this. The Phillips is UHF and the Winegard is UHF/VHF Scatter plane indoor antenna. I hope you can read this and get what I am trying to say.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#2
I don't believe either antenna is rated for outdoor use, in other words they will get wet.

When it comes to antennas it can be surprising what works and what doesn't even to the most seasoned antenna person.

I presume you bought the Winegard because you were having trouble with VHF?

Which one do you plan to run out doors? And which station are you not receiving?

I am thinking if you needed VHF you could have put a cheap pair of rabbit ears outside with a UVSJ instead of a common splitter. But I am guess now what you are trying to do.

TVFool.com plot would be nice also.
 

uceddiec

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#3
I tried the Wingard 3000 and it did about the same but not better. Yes the 3000 is indoor but the phillips I hve is indoor/outdoor and only gets one extra ch. out doors but its a good ch. For me the Wingard didnt live up to the hype, but it didnt do any worse.
 

FOX TV

Contributor
#4
Antenna Combining

I have the Phillips outdoor antenna that looks like a book and is UHF. I just ordered the Winegard SS3000 and plan on running both into a combiner "cant remember what its called but it is cheap" anyways...I am going to use one indoor and one outdoor to get the best combines signal into one cable. Is there any ohm issue or anything I am missing from this. The Phillips is UHF and the Winegard is UHF/VHF Scatter plane indoor antenna. I hope you can read this and get what I am trying to say.
The end result is that this combining of antennas is sometimes problematic, and may not work well in some areas. This can be caused by the fact that you will actually be using two UHF antennas that may see the same signal. I have an antenna combiner that has specific VHF and UHF inputs. I tried combining a UHF/VHF, along with a stand alone UHF and it will not decode 2 UHF channels that each antenna by themselves will receive.

This in my case is caused by the fact that the phasing of the antennas is not correct, thus causing an internal ghost signal between the two antennas. In essence, the two antennas are not in phase because of the different lengths of cable used on the different antennas. Theory says that if the coax cables were exactly the same length, it may work, but in my case it does not work.

If you are combining a stand alone VHF with a stand alone UHF, it should work fine. I am not saying it won't work in your case, but in my case, it will not work because I am close enough to the transmitters so that even the stand alone UHF that is pointed away from the strongest transmitters is still receiving the signals from those transmitters on the back side of the UHF antenna, and by combining the combo with the UHF and with two different cable lengths, it creates is own internal ghost, or phasing scenario. It may work well if you disable the UHF portion of the combo antenna, but try it first by combining both to see if it will work.
 
Top