Question: Two antennas to two different destinations

#1
Pursuant to another thread, I decided to use a converter box as a fancy AB switch, so I can go back and forth between my Monoprice HDA-5700 and my 4221HD and switch between Milwaukee and Chicago without rotating anything. I Got a great deal on an Insignia NS-DXA1 converter on eBay. I thought I was ordering a NS-DA1-APT (Analog Pass Through), as was pictured, but it was a mix up by the seller, so he gave me a $15 refund (after I suggested $10!) making the total price $14 for a very nice converter (but no APT).

I'm very happy with the converter. It works exactly as I expected, with main antenna hooked up to the F connector on the TV, and the Monoprice hooked up to the converter's F connection then joined to the TV with the RCA cords. I love the signal meter in the converter, plus the fancy menus for adding channels and the TV guide.

I'm definitely going to have to set up a Harmony remote to work with this Rube Goldberg contraption. It's going to be sweet.

Right now, I just have 3 feet of cable connecting the little antenna to the converter. That means the HDA-5700 is about chest high -- not optimal at all for reception. I'm going to have to get a longer cable. Was planning to use the converter for Chicago, but now I'm not sure. I would have to give up my two analog stations -- no "analog pass through." :Cry: I hardly ever look at them, but it's nice to be able to brag that they exist. :becky:

My question right now is whether there's any theoretical problem with positioning antennas when they are not physically connected at all. Since the two antennas are each going to a separate tuner, and from there to separate inputs on the TV, we can just think of this as two antennas each going to a completely separate TV. But I STILL worry about the two antennas competing for signal if I set them too close.

For instance, it would be ideal if I could put the Monoprice back to back with the 4221HD to get a kind of "double reflector" effect. Then I could swivel them both on the same lazy susan I've got rigged up, e.g. when I want to try to catch Indiana, south over Lake Michigan, or Fond du Lac to the north.

I know I'll have to try different positions and experiment. But from a theoretical point of view are you supposed to keep them as far apart as possible? Are there ANY restrictions, when two completely separate antennas go to two different places that just happen to be very close together?

I tried to google this, but can't find dirt on this specific situation. :ballchain:

Many Thanks In Advance,
Rick
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
Rick,

Indoor antennas have few rules. Your sink and fridge may be more responsible for receiving or not receiving channels. Yes, antennas can interact and at Channel-35 (600 mHz) antennas should be 35" apart from another antenna: they can be closer for higher channels and farther apart for lower channels. BUT ... that's by the book and not necessarily necessary ... Keep on being an Imagineer instead of an Engineer! Works for meeee! :becky:

Jim
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#3
If I've understood your post correctly...

No, you shouldn't run into any problems. The way you're doing it is scanning the availability of reception of one antenna, through one converter. Then, scanning another antenna's reception through another converter. That's separate systems, even though you are "combining" the received channels on the same TV, via different sources.

Just to take this a step farther...
Problems with using two Antennas arise when you combine them on one cable. One has to consider their direction, and not have any overlap in their beamwidths, and, that they have enough ability, to resist a channel creeping in from the rear. This of course is not your situation, I just thought I'd mention it. One might think of that situation like a panorama.. putting two pictures together to get one, with no overlaps.
 
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#4
Keep on being an Imagineer instead of an Engineer! Works for meeee! :becky:
You know, they're not mutually exclusive. I'm considered something of an expert in a subject about 1,000 light-years away from antennas, and the one guy I know in that field who knows more about the math of it than I do, and yet has a better imagination than I do, is a millionaire at age 30. Just ain't fair.

Thanks again to you and SWH. Your answers make me feel smarter than I really am. :cool:

Rick
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#5
Rick,

So, you admit you are working for the green antenna people, eh?

KIDDING!

I really would like to review stats on that antenna. I hate to pan anything, but when facts are refused what choice do we have?

Jim
 
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