Two points: Death of Roku hardware and lack of 1080p content

James

DTVUSA Member
#1
I happened to come upon an opinion blog where the writer makes to statements. One is in regards to ROKU hardware. he believes that because the newer TVs will be ROKU-ready the hardware will fade away.

His other point was that there is actually very little 1080p content available now. While our existing TVs can display it, there is not much actual content. So basically forget Ultra HD since no broadcasters plan on using up more bandwidth. And we already know 4K home TV is not real since our eyes can't tell the difference in a living room setting.

"The sad joke, though, is that despite widespread proliferation of Full HD 1080p TVs you actually consume very little 1080p content. Very few TV stations (cable and satellite) broadcast in 1080p due to bandwidth restrictions, instead opting for 720p or 1080i. 1080p is available in some areas from Netflix, and on Blu-ray discs, but that’s about it. Likewise, despite the arrival of Ultra High Definition TV, you probably won’t be watching UHD content for years to come. Streaming services like Netflix and YouTube will dabble in UHD programming, but there’s currently no optical disc standard that supports 4K, and there is no TV broadcaster anywhere on Earth that has yet laid out a timeline for UHD content. This won’t stop TV makers from advertising UHDTVs like they’re the next must-have gadget, though."


The hole..oops...whole thing is here.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#2
Roku hardware will continue to be produced as long as there are TV set manufacturers who do not build Roku into their TV sets - and that's a lot of TV sets. Even TV sets and BR players that offer some internet apps are limited in the content available, and people are using a Roku box to get more than just the handful of choices their TV or BR offers.

I have accepted that 1080p resolution is going to be limited to BR for the most part. Broadcast TV will be 480i, 720p, or 1080i - and thats that. Online, it's a cost/benefit thing for me - it's not worth the additional cost of the next tier of internet to watch a few things in 1080p. Besides that, to see the difference between 1080i and 1080p would require me to sit a LOT closer to the TV or I would have to buy a monster 70+" TV.
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#3
Roku is portable obviously. Can you take your device from one place to another (with wifi) and get the same service? Go to a friends house, plug in, and Boom! TV.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#4
I have taken my Roku across country with me and used it at hotels, and the homes and family and friends.
 
#5
That's cool. What was your pain threshold to get it to work on the road? Simply getting the WiFi password for the hotel or friend's house? Or harder than that?
 

tmcmeekin

DTVUSA Member
#9
I don't think set-top boxes will be dead for a long time. Most people are not early adopters: they'll only replace a TV when it breaks. Or maybe when they want a new TV, they still keep teir old one for another room. Yet a $50 box can be replaced a lot more often than a TV that costs hundreds or thousands of dollars. That's even assuming that every TV produced from now on had ALL the features of EVERY set top box, and that's not happening.

Death of Roku? Maybe, one company can certainly fail, but not the death of Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, and other set-top boxes.

As far as UHD/4K, I agree that it will probably be another 10 years before that becomes mainstream, if it does at all. (And by that time it might skip to 8K or holograms or something else we haven't even thought of yet.)
 
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