UHF vs VHS and POS

#1
Prior to converting to DTV I received both VHF Hi channels (2) and UHF channels (4). Since the conversion I receive only the VHF Hi, and zero UHF channels. There are 12 DTV channels available in my area. Here is my Tvfool.com printout (Zipode 83702):

TV Fool - TV Signal Locater

Or use this tiny url TV Fool - TV Signal Locater

My house is below the crest of a hill which blocks my Line of Sight (LOS). I suspect that this is the issue with the loss of DTV UHF channels. I am using the same in-attic antenna that worked fine for all the analog signals.

Moving the antenna to a roof top is a possibility, but it wont fix the LOS issue without putting up a 40' mast on top of my house, and that isn't going to happen.

Any (realistic) suggestions for fixing LOS issues or increasing signal strength that will overcome the LOS issue, or am I barking up the wrong tree?

TIA
MM
 
#2
use current antenna for VHF place a Antenna Direct 91-xg from solid signal 4 ft over the top of it. the 91-xg can be angled to 15 degrees so you an tilt it up to pickup signals from over top the hill join the two with a signal combiner also from solid signal, and you should get everything in the group to the north east. do not use a pre amp as you are too close to the transmitters and it will overload the tuners. you should get 47 off the side of the 91-xg it is so close and strong. also the attic cuts your antennas performance by 50% so with weaker UHF signals this would cause a problem move to out side and if that doesn't work try the 91-xg and tilt it to shoot over the hill.
 
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#3
Let me make sure I am understanding you. First I should move my existing antenna outside. If that doesn't fix it (and I kind of doubt it will) then add the 91-xg on top of it with a signal combiner. Right?

Also any idea how much the 91-xg and combiner should cost?
 
#4
I just saw Cowboy's post on Antenna reviews. As an added question, since I have two VHF hi channels and the rest are UHF can I use JUST the 91-xg antenna? Or do I still need my existing analog antenna PLUS the 91-xg?
 
#5
I just saw Cowboy's post on Antenna reviews. As an added question, since I have two VHF hi channels and the rest are UHF can I use JUST the 91-xg antenna? Or do I still need my existing analog antenna PLUS the 91-xg?
The 91-xg will not get High Vhf like some of the 8 bay Antennas like the Antenna Craft u8000 of the channel master 4228 but if the VHF side of the old antenna works well I would use it, I suggested the 91-xg because you could tilt it to get better reception from over the hill. if you need a VHF then the wine guard that I recommend in my deep fringe reception would do the trick.:)
 

bxr45h

DTVUSA Rookie
#6
Howdy. Old 1980's TV: 2 screws for flat leads from VHF antenna (channels 2-13), 2 screws for flat leads from "separate" UHF antenna (14 and above, which in 2009 is supposed to keep only 18 channels; others to go to communications and phones). I understand the 300 ohm flat twin lead to 75 ohm coaxial conversion. What I wasn't sure about is do I only need to make the connections from the VHF antenna and VHF side of the tv, or do I have to combine both the VHF and UHF leads together, reverse split, coaxil into the digital converter box, coaxil out of the convertor box, then split the UHF and VHF again to the 4 screws on the tv. The 30 ft high uhf and vhf antennas were separated due to directions the antennas have to be up signals from Temple (40 mi) Austin (60 mi) and Waco (60 mi) Tx in a very rural location. From my understanding, digital signals will eventually be transmitted on both VHF and UHF frequencies depending on what the TV station picks? ... or am I incorrect?
 
#7
Howdy. Old 1980's TV: 2 screws for flat leads from VHF antenna (channels 2-13), 2 screws for flat leads from "separate" UHF antenna (14 and above, which in 2009 is supposed to keep only 18 channels; others to go to communications and phones). I understand the 300 ohm flat twin lead to 75 ohm coaxial conversion. What I wasn't sure about is do I only need to make the connections from the VHF antenna and VHF side of the tv, or do I have to combine both the VHF and UHF leads together, reverse split, coaxil into the digital converter box, coaxil out of the convertor box, then split the UHF and VHF again to the 4 screws on the tv. The 30 ft high uhf and vhf antennas were separated due to directions the antennas have to be up signals from Temple (40 mi) Austin (60 mi) and Waco (60 mi) Tx in a very rural location. From my understanding, digital signals will eventually be transmitted on both VHF and UHF frequencies depending on what the TV station picks? ... or am I incorrect?
they make a transformer that has four leads so you could use one of those.
go to tvfool.com put in your address and you can see what they will be now and what they will be post transition, also will give good idea of what you can get.:)
 
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