Use a roof TV antenna as an FM antenna?

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#2
:welcome:

As long as the antenna was designed to receive TV channels 2 through 6, the answer is probably yes. If the antenna looks anything like this one...

... then you're probably all set. It's those long elements toward the back of the boom that do the best job pulling in FM signals.

On the other hand, if your antenna has any sort of built-in amplifier -- particularly if the works are inside a plastic enclosure, and it needs power from a wall wart to work right -- be aware that many such models also include an "FM trap" designed to reduce interference to TV signals from nearby radio stations. These antennas will still pick up local FM stations, but the trap-and-amp combination can degrade sound quality badly.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#3
Useing a Separator for FM/HD Radio Signals

Welcome to the Forum DCO,

Assuming you've checked your Antenna out as Don has suggested, and IF it will receive FM, then, here's a way to get all that done.

First of all, not only "should" you be able to receive FM, but HD Radio too.
It's something that many Audiophiles are really into !

Anyhow...
As your cable comes into your HT Area, you can then route it to the...
Winegard CA-8800 FM Separator
This gives you a Pass-through for your TV Signals, routing a Coax out of it, and to your FM Receiver.

Now, if you have a newer Receiver, the Coax will screw right on to the "F" terminal for the Antenna, or, if you have an older Receiver, use a...
Matching Transformer
To convert the input to 300 Ohm on the two Terminals.
You may also need a couple short pieces of Coax to hook it all up.

Have a good Day ! :)
S.W.
 
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EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#4
What Don and SWHouston said.

Be aware that some Combo or VHF Television antennnas are designed to have suck outs or attenuation on FM frequencies....just from the design of the elements on the boom.

The easiest thing to do is to try the antenna you have and see what you get with an FM Tuner.
 
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SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#5
DCO,

I think what EV meant (and it's a good idea by the way) is to first..

Get the Coax from your Antenna, directly on your Receiver. Use that Matching Transformer if you have to.

Then, tune in on something, and see if your Signal Strength jumps up, which it should. If that's the case, then your Antenna will do FM/HDR.

Have a good Day ! :)
S.W.

PS: Sorry to step in on your comment EV,
but I just didn't think he may have caught what you meant by "try".
 
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Piggie

Super Moderator
#7
What Don and SWHouston said.

Be aware that some Combo or VHF Television antennas are designed to have suck outs or attenuation on FM frequencies....just from the design of the elements on the boom.

The easiest thing to do is to try the antenna you have and see what you get with an FM Tuner.
Unlikely it will not have some significant performance on FM. It's really hard to build an antenna with the percentage bandwidth to cover low band TV and have it stop at FM frequencies.

It may approach or be slightly below unity but the fact it's on the roof, it will pick up a lot of signals not available inside an dwelling.
 
#8
I believe he was referring to the FM stubs used on some antennas. They are of the proper length to represent a short-circuit at the FM band.

Think of them as a passive FM filter that is part of the antenna. I have 20-year old Radio Shack antenna that has these stubs that can be rotated to either permit or to kill FM.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#9
I believe he was referring to the FM stubs used on some antennas. They are of the proper length to represent a short-circuit at the FM band.

Think of them as a passive FM filter that is part of the antenna. I have 20-year old Radio Shack antenna that has these stubs that can be rotated to either permit or to kill FM.
interesting, never seen one.
 
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