What connector do I need to go from dual wire antenna cable to single?

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#2
:welcome:

They're called coax transformers or baluns (a contraction of the words "BALanced," as in the twinlead you described, with "UNbalanced," as in a coaxial cable). Baluns may be designed for direct connection to the terminals of an outdoor antenna, like this one:

... or they can be for indoor use, such as this one, which plugs directly into the coaxial RF input on the back panel of a TV, VCR, DVR or DVD recorder:

... or like this one, which outputs signals from coaxial cable on two twinlead cables for connection with separate VHF and UHF screw terminals on older analog TVs:

 

FOX TV

Contributor
#3
What kind of connector will convert dual antenna cable to a single coax?

(1st post but been lurking for a while)
Welcome to the forum, and by the way, the dual antenna cable you refer to is known as 300 ohm Twin Lead cable, and is very susceptible to Ultra Violet damage from the sun. It is also more susceptible to picking up man made and natural background noise such as lightning generated electrical noise, leaking Spark plug wires on cars or lawn mowers, and many other sources of electrical noise, which could cause reception problems on some VHF channels

You do have the option of converting the cable to 75 ohm coaxial cable type RG-6 at the antenna using one of the baluns or transformers in the first picture posted by by Don M. you can then use RG-6 coaxial cable from the antenna to the TV set. On the other hand, If your twin lead is fairly new and in good shape, it could last for several more years and may not need replacing. This type of cable normally deteriorates closer to the antenna, due to it getting almost full time sun exposure. If you do not get a signal through the cable, inspect it near the antenna for deterioration, and consider re=cabling the antenna with RG-6 cable.
 
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SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#4
Greetings NewGuy welcome to the Forum :welcome:

Don's approach, in using the adapter is the simplest way to do that, but...

Making the changeover to Coaxial Cable as Fox_TV has suggested, could vastly improve your reception quality. It did for me (many years go) when I gave in and changed.

My problem then, was deterioration of the Twin Lead, but, it's up to you.

Have a good Day ! :)
S.W.
 
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NewGuy

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#6
Welcome to the forum, and by the way, the dual antenna cable you refer to is known as 300 ohm Twin Lead cable, and is very susceptible to Ultra Violet damage from the sun. It is also more susceptible to picking up man made and natural background noise such as lightning generated electrical noise, leaking Spark plug wires on cars or lawn mowers, and many other sources of electrical noise, which could cause reception problems on some VHF channels

You do have the option of converting the cable to 75 ohm coaxial cable type RG-6 at the antenna using one of the baluns or transformers in the first picture posted by by Don M. you can then use RG-6 coaxial cable from the antenna to the TV set. On the other hand, If your twin lead is fairly new and in good shape, it could last for several more years and may not need replacing. This type of cable normally deteriorates closer to the antenna, due to it getting almost full time sun exposure. If you do not get a signal through the cable, inspect it near the antenna for deterioration, and consider re=cabling the antenna with RG-6 cable.
Thank you for the suggestion. I may have to think about it. Worse yet my twin lead cable is partially direct burried from what I discovered the other day. I think the last home owner was on drugs when he wired the house.
 

NewGuy

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#7
Greetings NewGuy welcome to the Forum :welcome:

Don's approach, in using the adapter is the simplest way to do that, but...

Making the changeover to Coaxial Cable as Fox_TV has suggested, could vastly improve your reception quality. It did for me (many years go) when I gave in and changed.

My problem then, was deterioration of the Twin Lead, but, it's up to you.

Have a good Day ! :)
S.W.
Thank you for the info. What about detoriation from being direct buried?
 

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#8
I think the last home owner was on drugs when he wired the house.
BWAHAHAHA!

What about deterioration from being direct buried?
Depends on the condition of the soil in which it's buried. Cables of all kinds can last quite a long time in dry soil -- deserts, or that found in crawl spaces well above the water table and with good foundation drainage. Ditto if Druggie the Previous Owner actually did it the right way by fishing the cable through conduit.

Twinlead isn't designed for direct burial in wet soils, found pretty much everywhere east of the Mississippi and in the Great Lakes region, Gulf Coast and coastal Pacific Northwest. Cable like this is probably well worth replacing, even after just a few years. Same goes for twinlead way up by the mast, where it's vulnerable to rapid UV damage from being in the sun for so many hours each day.

If you decide on total replacement, go with black RG-6 cable. As counter-intuitive as it may sound, the black jacket stands up to UV better than any other color, particularly white.
 

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