What does DMA mean when talking about reception?

Aldey

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
I spoke with an antenna technician today and he kept talking about DMA in regards to digital television. I have no idea what it means and I didn't want to sound stupid while on the phone.
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
#2
Wiki could explain it better than I ever could....but basically Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Gainville, Jacksonville are all DMA centers....an area around a population center, usually a city or town where media covers an area or region.

Designated Market Area
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#3
DMA (Designated Television Market) set up by the Nielsen Corporation, not the government.

It is a metropolitan area, including rural area surrounding it that is considered a TV market. In "theory" it's also about the same as the local TV stations coverage.

Everyone everywhere in the US, is in a DMA

They are rated by the number of households in each by a numbering system.

With NYC generally considered to be market #1. You will see other lists and even some variation in the Nielsen numbers depending on the year the statistic were grabbed. There are also other similar rating systems like READS on RabbitEars.Info

I could go on and on but it's covered pretty well here Whats DMA?

If you wonder what DMA you live in you can probably just query Google with the question for your city. If that doesn't work, tell us your city or list of stations you receive.
 

Yes616

The Mod Squad
#9
I spoke with an antenna technician today and he kept talking about DMA in regards to digital television. I have no idea what it means and I didn't want to sound stupid while on the phone.
I think that technician was saying something to you about what DMA did you want to receive? You might be near the border line of 2 or maybe even 3 of them. If this is the case, it would determine what kind of antenna you might want and if a rotator might be considered as you might want to turn the antenna from time to time.

Post that TV Fool report here and we can understand you wants and needs better.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#10
I live in such an area, on the border of 3 DMAs. But with me, only one is close enough for UHF reception, which is average of 30 miles. The other two towns are 61 and 82. Despite the common belief Florida is flat and LOS goes on forever, our small sand hills and pine trees often make over 45 miles impossible on UHF. (short of a 70 feet of tower)
 

Yes616

The Mod Squad
#11
I live in such an area, on the border of 3 DMAs. But with me, only one is close enough for UHF reception, which is average of 30 miles. The other two towns are 61 and 82. Despite the common belief Florida is flat and LOS goes on forever, our small sand hills and pine trees often make over 45 miles impossible on UHF. (short of a 70 feet of tower)
Piggie! You of all people, I would have thought had a tower so high that by law you would need a flashing red beacon on top of it so you could pick up everything in FL and GA too. :D
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#12
Piggie! You of all people, I would have thought had a tower so high that by law you would need a flashing red beacon on top of it so you could pick up everything in FL and GA too. :D
used when I was young enough to climb. frustrating with a bad knee that I can't climb or my antenna would be at least 60 ft up. getting old sucks.
 

Eureka

DTVUSA Member
#13
I live in such an area, on the border of 3 DMAs. But with me, only one is close enough for UHF reception, which is average of 30 miles. The other two towns are 61 and 82.
I am also on the edge of 3 DMAs;
N/NE: Springfield, MO (71+ miles)
N/NW: Joplin, MO (62+ miles)
S/SW: Fayetteville, AR (45 miles)

I get all the Springfield & Fayetteville channels quite well (except for the usual impulse noise on the VHFs :( ). I only get one of the Joplin stations (UHF), but it's not reliable 24/7.

Being on a 1400' hill gives me LOS to Springfield. Unfortunately, bigger hills block LOS to some or most of the stations in the other two DMAs.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#14
Better than I on UHF. Only one of the three DMAs provide me a reliable UHF signal.
I am at 40 ft AMSL and Jacksonville FL towers are about 20 ft AMSL. They are only 300 meter towers which for the size market to me are short with so many other markets with 500 meter towers.

Jacksonville FL is 61 miles away. LOS between me and the tower is about 50 some miles if we were both on perfectly flat ground. But there is a sand hill about half way between us at 180 ft AMSL. And another one about 100 ft. Then add mostly pine forests on top of that up to 40 to 60 ft.

Florida is only flat below Orlando.
 

Eureka

DTVUSA Member
#15
At least two of the Springfield towers are over 2000' and on a hill, which puts them around 3500' AMSL. That, plus the fact that I'm on a 1400' hill, gives me LOS to that market, even at 71+ miles away. Most of the Fayetteville stations are 1 edge or 2 edge, but I also get those with no problem. Exception is their lone VHF 9, which is dropout-plagued if lightning is occuring anywhere in the Ozarks region.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#16
At least two of the Springfield towers are over 2000' and on a hill, which puts them around 3500' AMSL. That, plus the fact that I'm on a 1400' hill, gives me LOS to that market, even at 71+ miles away. Most of the Fayetteville stations are 1 edge or 2 edge, but I also get those with no problem. Exception is their lone VHF 9, which is dropout-plagued if lightning is occuring anywhere in the Ozarks region.
I guess Fayetteville is closer than Springfield to you making 1 and 2 edge possible?

VHF and lightning is the same problem everywhere. We had a LOT of lightning yesterday afternoon and it wasn't just glitches on VHF but it had the picture frozen more than receiving it. I think I posted somewhere on this board about research showing cloud to cloud lightning being worse than cloud to ground lighting on VHF, but that is pulling this thread too far off to talk about it here.
 

FOX TV

Contributor
#17
Dma

I spoke with an antenna technician today and he kept talking about DMA in regards to digital television. I have no idea what it means and I didn't want to sound stupid while on the phone.
DMA stands for Designated Market Area, which is actually your physical broadcast territory, normally designated by a group of counties where your Over the Air broadcast signal is supposed to cover. Each OTA broadcaster has an assigned DMA that is your exclusive coverage area that is protected by the FCC in regards to other broadcasters, as well as Direc TV and Dish Network in regards to allowed viewers territory also.
 
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