What's a good RV TV antenna?

J

JackW

Guest
#1
I'm going to be traveling down route 66 with my wife and RV next week. The trip is going to last for about a month and we want to watch TV as we pull off the route and sleep overnight. What's a good, mid-sized antenna I can mount to the top of my RV on a foldable mount?
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#2
You're not hoping to get TV while in transit, right? It still might be difficult to pick up signals even if you're pulled off the road (some of route 66 is far away from TV antennas).
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#3
Winegard make a series of these with inbult amplifiers (16dB from memory), they work ok over here on horizontally polarised stations (all of US is horizontally polarised last i heard).

(Half of ours are vertically polarised, and large swathes of the country rely on satellite)
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#4
Guest,

Any TV reception you may receive will be best received with a horizontal antenna. Until the post above, I didn't know vertical polarization was (still) used anywhere on the globe. I thought all vertical polarization (TV) ended around 1947/1948.

Jim
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#5
Fringe: Its still used in Europe, Australia/NZ, and likely large swathes of the rest of the world (you may be aware already, but ill add this for others: it allows high powered co-channels to be placed closer than would otherwise be possible [eg. CH6 V and CH6 H could be placed closer than 2x CH6 H without any ill effect) :)
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#6
Fringe: Its still used in Europe, Australia/NZ, and likely large swathes of the rest of the world (you may be aware already, but ill add this for others: it allows high powered co-channels to be placed closer than would otherwise be possible [eg. CH6 V and CH6 H could be placed closer than 2x CH6 H without any ill effect) :)
nBound,

That's very interesting and new to me. Back in the analog days there was a Channel 6 in British Columbia and a Channel 6 in Portland, Oregon but neither could be received by the average viewer in the Seattle area. Are both H and V polorization currently being used with digital broadcasting and if so, how well does it work?

Jim
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#7
Back on topic - my parents have a trailer that came with a "UFO" shaped antenna that worked pretty good back in the analog days. It used to get Toronto, Canada from the south shore of Lake Ontario in NY at a height of about 15 ft. I'm not sure how it will work in the digital age, but I'm going for a visit in June and Mom says she's putting us up in the trailer - so I'll learn what I can about the antenna then, and report back.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#8
JackW,

You said you have a foldable mount. Is this a Motorhome mast that can be controlled from inside the coach or is it a home-type mast that has a hinge, and you have to climb on top of the coach to raise and rotate it? If it is the latter, you could probably use a screen-type antenna like a Channel Master 4228HD. When lowered to the rooftop, it would lie flat and you wouldn't have to disassemble it.

This coming summer I have a job scheduled to redo the antenna setup on a 32 foot coach and that is what I'm going to try. The coach has an aluminum skin, so it will likely require the antenna to be at least ten feet above the roofline to avoid or at least reduce potential signal reflections.

Jim
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#9
nBound,

That's very interesting and new to me. Back in the analog days there was a Channel 6 in British Columbia and a Channel 6 in Portland, Oregon but neither could be received by the average viewer in the Seattle area. Are both H and V polorization currently being used with digital broadcasting and if so, how well does it work?

Jim
Yes both are being used for digital (in fact my local transmitter is vertically polarised). It works pretty well. ACMA (our FCC) places stations on the same channel at least minimum distance apart so they cannot cause interference. Our co-channels are still some distance apart (its no magic bullet), but that distance is less than would otherwise be required. You can see the attenuation of signal (and therefore reduction of interference) by turning one of your antennas 90 degrees while attached to a signal meter (ie. its possible to receive signals in the wrong polarisation, just harder!).

We even have some areas where you need a UHF and a VHF aerial, one polarised horizontally, one vertically to receive all stations (including our nations capital, Canberra!). Though we are "restacking" our channels in a few years after switchover so the govt can sell the 700Mhz+ spectrum. And this restack should (amongst other things) eliminate crosspolarised areas like that.
 
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