What's the record for most over-the-air channels received?

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#1
I know New York City and Los Angeles have the largest market of television stations but is there a single record holder for a single TV setup that's received 40+ channels? Some of you DX'rs out there are probably giggling at this right now, I could be off, maybe the record is much higher. :dunce:
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
Aaron, I'll bite.
This past summer I bought, built and tested many antennas but I ran out of summer. Consequently, I didn't get them permanently installed, except for one. During testing, I established 33 solid channels including subs. I also found the carrier from an analog VHF-10 from British Columbia. So, although I cannot currently view all of these, I claim 33.5!
Jim
 
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#4
Aaron, I'll bite.
This past summer I bought, built and tested many antennas but I ran out of summer. Consequently, I didn't get them permanently installed, except for one. During testing, I established 33 solid channels including subs. I also found the carrier from an analog VHF-10 from British Columbia. So, although I cannot currently view all of these, I claim 33.5!
Jim
Pretty impressive. What kind of antennas are you guys using? We almost need to do a "What kind of antenna do you own" thread. ;)
 

FOX TV

Contributor
#5
50 scanned RF channels

I know New York City and Los Angeles have the largest market of television stations but is there a single record holder for a single TV setup that's received 40+ channels? Some of you DX'rs out there are probably giggling at this right now, I could be off, maybe the record is much higher. :dunce:
I went to a cable head end to do some signal tests (see this thread for the full story, http://www.dtvusaforum.com/dtv-hdtv...signal-quality-affects-dtv-reception-too.html)

This cable head end was on a 4,300 foot mountain, and after performing a channel scan, the receiver found 50 Rf channels, and if each one was running 2 channels, that would obviously be over 100 channels of programming available for free. The drawback here is that my house is not located there.

We were actually receiving channels from 3 states at that elevation. We obviously got everything in our Virginia market, along with stations from West Virginia, and North Carolina.. Its a shame that someone could not build a receive site there and offer all of those channels in a OTA package to viewers for a much smaller fee than cable or satellite.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#6
Pretty impressive. What kind of antennas are you guys using? We almost need to do a "What kind of antenna do you own" thread. ;)
---------------------------------
HT,
From my location, the transmitters are located at five compass points, basically N,S,E and W. To the west I use a CM-4228 for 13, 20 and 26, for the (just north of) east I built two cut-to-channel Yagis: 11 bar for 38/39 a 10 bar for 48 and (just south of east) a 7-bar for 9/11. The first antenna I built was a 15 bar for channel 35, pointed north and I receive 27 on it from the rear without rotating it. I have started to put some photos of them in my album here.
Jim :usa2:
 

weroberts

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#7
There are 12 stations LOS from me (Elyria, OH 44035) I get 9 of those but with the multiple channels per station I get 18 with an indoor antenna. The 3 I don't get are 35 miles away and at 137 degrees instead of the majority that are 97 Degrees and about 22 miles away. However i do get one of the stations from the Akron area (137 degrees) Prior to the Switch I never reliably got anything from Akron anyway.
I have an Echostar TR-40, Haven't tested my JVC DVD Recorder w/Tuner yet.
The Antenna is something I'm developing.
Will
 
#8
the most i get is a total of 27 (including sub-channels) which is three under what the cheapest satellite package offers (granted there's no Nickelodeon or 24/7 PBS Kids like on that package) but that number is going down to 25 if i see any more crap from my once-favorite RTV.

That one's going bye-bye once i settle my issues with Adobe Flash Player, so i can then watch real classic TV online instead.
 

Jim1348

DTVUSA Member
#10
Wow, those are some impressive results. About 30 years ago I decided to do some experimenting at my parents house. They lived in a rural part of Minnesota about 40 some miles south of Duluth MN. Back in the NTSC days they received local channels 3, 6, 8, and 10 okay. I put up a pretty large VHF log periodic pointed at Shoreview MN so they could also get 2, 4, 5, 9, and 11. I wasn't sure if adding rotor would would well, so I decided to just have the separate antennas and combine the input to the TV set. My father was pleased because the Twin Cities locals had additional local news broadcasts that weren't carried in the Duluth Superior DMA. Other than the hobby aspect of it, I am not particularly interested in watching OTA from other markets because they generally carry the same network programs and locally produced content usually doesn't interest me since I don't live in that area.

On a somewhat related note, I am wondering if anybody here watched any local channels that stream on the web? Our KMSP streams its local news broadcast online and I do watch it on occasion if I am out of town or once in awhile on a laptop computer if I am not near a TV. I would like to see the other broadcasters do this, but I suppose their is little incentive for them to do this. I doubt that it contributes much to their revenue stream.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#11
FOX_TV,

We have much the same situation here in Houston, save that there are Seven Antenna Farms around us.
The Main one is south in Mo (Missouri) City at W95.658/N29.570.
It has around 40 main with many having 3 subs, and others with 6 subs, making about 60 or so. The other Farms provide us with another 25 or so channels.

Understood that it takes a powerful setup to reach out for some of those Farms, and the usual approach is just to aim at the Mo City, which has all of the Majors, and several that I for one, have no interest in at all.

So, I'm going to say a comfortable 85 for us if you wanna spend the bucks to get them. Otherwise, a Paper Clip will get you about 30 :D

Have a good Day ! :)
S.W.
 

weroberts

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#12
Update:
I'm at 27 with Subs with an indoor antenna, (no amp) I developed with the farthest station being 35.6 miles away and a NM (dB) of 35.5. This covers anything LOS The Compass headings are mainly 97 degrees but the farther stations are 135 degrees from me.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#13
WER,
If what you're saying is that your getting 27 Channels with your Indoor Antenna and that TR-40 Box at 36 miles, that's EXCEPTIONAL !
Hang on to that combo !

I bet it's a lot to do with the Tuner in the TR-40. I know the DTVPal Plus has a Silicone Tuner (as opposed to the cheaper Metal ones) and the TR must have the same. GOOD VIEWING to you !

Have a good Day ! :)
S.W.
 
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JakesDTVBlog

DTVUSAForum Member, , , Webmaster of: Jake's DTV B
#14
On a couple of rare occasions, I've topped 50 channels (including subs) with just a coat-hanger antenna and my Maggotbox converters, but a normal daytime number is around 20, with up to 30 about 3 to 4 nights a week.

If I was able to be in the RV more often, the Winegard Sensar batwing antenna, which is boosted, can sometimes grab a few more channels. But with winter coming on, I've got that rig bedded down for the duration.
 
#15
with the Winter-time Squalls happening now, i don't pick up nearly the amounts i used to. i can still hold onto WAZE-DT each night and sometimes WBKO comes in (why WAZE is so perfect i don't know, i'm thinking they finally got it together) but others such as WPSD have been MIA save for a week or so back, i got it long enough to pull in a radar image.

With my crappaq Presuckio working with Linux though, and internet finally being distributed wirelessly throughout the entire resort (waited 3 years for that!) the chances of watching OTA much any more are becoming thin. Youtube and many other sites are hosting shows i used to have to pay a satellite subscription for. shows like Star Trek TNG and Voyager, old Toon Disney favorites, and some Nickelodeon shows, in addition to my fixes of previously lost classic TV favorites such as The Munsters, The A-Team, and Airwolf (not the remake) among them.
 
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#16
Right in the heart of LA I'd imagine has the most. You guys in the city have alot of luck with just a cheap UHF/Dipole. I get about 12-15 right now because the leaves are gone.
 
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#17
I know New York City and Los Angeles have the largest market of television stations but is there a single record holder for a single TV setup that's received 40+ channels? Some of you DX'rs out there are probably giggling at this right now, I could be off, maybe the record is much higher. :dunce:
72 channels
Good question, I live in livermore, Ca. This is about 50 miles East of San Francisco or San Jose. I am using an Elgato EyeTV 500 box, hooked up to my Macintosh. I also have a decoder box (Apex DT250, second one, first one burned up at the start of November) hooked up to my TV. Both use the same antenna (Winegard HD 4400 4-Bay), via a splitter and a radio shack antenna amplifier. I just did a scan using the Elgato box, 72 channels. I don't know about anyone else, but here I am receiving channel 1-1 through 1-12. Interesting programming, like 1980s MTV and Monterey Ca. television for any divers. Also international television and Flash Gordon, Roy Rogers and Dale E, Crash Gordon, The Andy Griffith Show and lots of old time TV shows.
Livermore is located in a valley. There are hills between me and the SF bay, also there is a quite large Mountain north of here, Mount Diablo, and South is Mount Hamilton. So I must be getting some bending of the waves on a reliable basis since I have good signal strength on many of my channels except channel 11, NBC. I am going to change my antenna to a Antennas Direct DB8 to see if this improves the signal strength between the day and night reception. I like these Bow Tie antennas because of their low wind loading. All of my old Yagi antenna have been removed or damaged by high winds. Oh I forgot to mention that my antenna is roof mounted about 35 feet above ground.
 
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Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#18
Good question, I live in livermore, Ca. This is about 50 miles East of San Francisco or San Jose. I am using an Elgato EyeTV 500 box, hooked up to my Macintosh. I also have a decoder box (Apex DT250, second one, first one burned up at the start of November) hooked up to my TV. Both use the same antenna (Winegard HD 4400 4-Bay), via a splitter and a radio shack antenna amplifier. I just did a scan using the Elgato box, 72 channels. I don't know about anyone else, but here I am receiving channel 1-1 through 1-12. Interesting programming, like 1980s MTV and Monterey Ca. television for any divers. Also international television and Flash Gordon, Roy Rogers and Dale E, Crash Gordon, The Andy Griffith Show and lots of old time TV shows.
Livermore is located in a valley. There are hills between me and the SF bay, also there is a quite large Mountain north of here, Mount Diablo, and South is Mount Hamilton. So I must be getting some bending of the waves on a reliable basis since I have good signal strength on many of my channels except channel 11, NBC. I am going to change my antenna to a Antennas Direct DB8 to see if this improves the signal strength between the day and night reception. I like these Bow Tie antennas because of their low wind loading. All of my old Yagi antenna have been removed or damaged by high winds. Oh I forgot to mention that my antenna is roof mounted about 35 feet above ground.
wow I need to try an outdoor antenna. I'm a bit south of you (in northern LA) but only manage 30-35 stations (depending on weather and outside conditions). Outstanding though, I wish I could mount something on the roof of my apartment complex but they won't let me. ;)
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#19
Sneaky Looking Antennas for HOA/Apartment use

Aaron,

Just wanted to point out some very "Sneaky" type Antennas.
On some occasions, when these are Flat Mounted against a building,
they look like Vent Covers, and are frequently "permitted" because of the
non TV Antenna look.

Of course, this depends on if you have a location/outside wall facing the Transmitters,
but, these are fairly Multi-Directional, so, aiming a little off center or an alternate wall may work.
Could be that one of these may let you get an Antenna outside ?

Take a look at a...
Vertical Round Antenna
or the...
The “Shirt Box” type

Have a good Day ! :)
S.W.
 
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FOX TV

Contributor
#20
On a couple of rare occasions, I've topped 50 channels (including subs) with just a coat-hanger antenna and my Maggotbox converters, but a normal daytime number is around 20, with up to 30 about 3 to 4 nights a week.

If I was able to be in the RV more often, the Winegard Sensar batwing antenna, which is boosted, can sometimes grab a few more channels. But with winter coming on, I've got that rig bedded down for the duration.
Maggotbox converters...LOL Great line !! I do like them if for no other reason than the numerical signal strength readout instead of a graphical scale where you have to use a sharpie or tape and mark your CRT screen to see if there are any improvements in signal strength if you change anything.
 
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