Which stations are considered low power stations?

1inxs

DTVUSA Member
#4
I live in Park County, Wyoming and I know of at least 2 stations that aren't going digital this week (I think) but I want confirm. Anybody have a list?
Contact you local County Engineer for the answer. They will tell you the channels the translators are broadcasting in analog or digital before and after the transition.
 
#5
Most low power stations are local city stuff or spanish/foreign channels and religious channels. They are allowed to stay on analog right now.
 
#6
but only for a few more years. eventually they're going digital too. i do wonder what will become of analog TV bands, if they're possibly going to be sold to private entities who may do like some Colleges do with radio; they may become individual stations who broadcast a canned selection so i don't think analog TV is going away for good. it just won't be used by the local affiliates such as NBC, FOX, and others.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#7
but only for a few more years. eventually they're going digital too. i do wonder what will become of analog TV bands, if they're possibly going to be sold to private entities who may do like some Colleges do with radio; they may become individual stations who broadcast a canned selection so i don't think analog TV is going away for good. it just won't be used by the local affiliates such as NBC, FOX, and others.
They aren't going anywhere, they are used now by the DTV stations. There never was an "analog band" or a "digital band", just the TV band.

Eventually all analog will be gone. There isn't a date set yet for Low Power or Class A stations to convert, but the FCC promised it is coming in the next 3 to 5 years.

The really big question is what will happen to Low Band. Whom ever at the FCC though it was suitable for DTV was smoking something (actually it was a scam to sell off 52-59 saying "Hey we left you 2-6"

In my humble opinion, they should allow low power analog to remain on 2-6 for the near future.
 

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