Why cant I get any Fox affiliate?

shotinthedark

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
I live in Monroe, New Jersey. Thats between New York City and Philadelphia. With my new DTV converter I can't get Fox TV Channel 29 in Philadelphia OR Channel 5 in NYC??? Can I enhance my signal. My DTV is connected to an old fashioned roof antenna, thats pretty huge. In the ancient analogue days I got both!
 
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Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#2
Welcome! You'll need to provide a ZIP code so we can look up general signal conditions. Turns out there are two townships named Monroe in New Jersey -- one in Middlesex County (south of NYC), the other in Gloucester County (south of Philly). Nailing down distances to the two markets will provide a starting point for solving this riddle.
 

bicker

DTVUSA Member
#3
I used to live in southern Middlesex County, and my father lives in Ocean Country. We weren't able to get decent reception over-the-air from either location. We got the local public television station from Trenton, but that was it.
 
#4
I found out quite by accident that Fox and MyNetworkTV affiliates share the same frequencies, as a consequence of Fox buying the MyNetworkTV stations a few years ago (which I didn't know). So DTV Channel 5-1 is the New York Fox station and Channel 5-2 is the New York MyNetworkTV station. Likewise, Channel 9-1 is the New York MyNetworkTV station, and Channel 9-2 is the New York Fox station. Same feeds, except that 9-2 is full screen and 5-1 is letterbox. So if you can't get Fox on one, try the other.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#5
I found out quite by accident that Fox and MyNetworkTV affiliates share the same frequencies, as a consequence of Fox buying the MyNetworkTV stations a few years ago (which I didn't know). So DTV Channel 5-1 is the New York Fox station and Channel 5-2 is the New York MyNetworkTV station. Likewise, Channel 9-1 is the New York MyNetworkTV station, and Channel 9-2 is the New York Fox station. Same feeds, except that 9-2 is full screen and 5-1 is letterbox. So if you can't get Fox on one, try the other.
Welcome to the forum Greg!

We still need to know where shotinthedark lives, which Monroe. We don't know if he is closer to NYC or Philly or neither. Both Fox/MyN stations in NYC are UHF and might not get to his house, depending on which Monroe is his.

We need your zip code shotinthedark to keep helping.
 

shotinthedark

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#7
welcome! You'll need to provide a zip code so we can look up general signal conditions. Turns out there are two townships named monroe in new jersey -- one in middlesex county (south of nyc), the other in gloucester county (south of philly). Nailing down distances to the two markets will provide a starting point for solving this riddle.
my zip is 08831
 
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shotinthedark

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#8
I found out quite by accident that Fox and MyNetworkTV affiliates share the same frequencies, as a consequence of Fox buying the MyNetworkTV stations a few years ago (which I didn't know). So DTV Channel 5-1 is the New York Fox station and Channel 5-2 is the New York MyNetworkTV station. Likewise, Channel 9-1 is the New York MyNetworkTV station, and Channel 9-2 is the New York Fox station. Same feeds, except that 9-2 is full screen and 5-1 is letterbox. So if you can't get Fox on one, try the other.

Since FOX ownd My9 I tried that already. But Channel 9 is also unreceivable.
Its like I live in limbo between ranges.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#9
my zip is 08831
Since FOX ownd My9 I tried that already. But Channel 9 is also unreceivable.
Its like I live in limbo between ranges.
Glad you gave us the zip, I was on the wrong Monroe, somewhere south of Easton, NJ.

Now to your antenna.

How high off the ground is it about?

Do you have a rotor?

Do you know if you have any amplifiers in the system?

Do you have any splitters going to more than one room even not hooked up but going through a splitter?
 

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#10
Here's a link to a ZIP code-based TVFool report for 08831. IIRC, that's a fairly flat area (partial disclosure: grew up in Morris County :cheers:; number of years elapsed since then shall remain undisclosed :eek:). The ZIP's land area should be compact, so this should be somewhat valid.

Almost all of those stations in green are from NYC (38 degrees, 38 miles), which should be an easy get with any decent all-channel antenna above the roof; Philly (246 degrees, 48 miles) is a bit more difficult, but by no means impossible with a roof antenna. The usual suspects are: Either some component of the system (antenna, downlead cable, splitter, etc.), or combination of them, has worn out from weathering or age; an amp is needed due to the number of sets running off the antenna; or there's too much amplification for one or two sets.
 

shotinthedark

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#11
Glad you gave us the zip, I was on the wrong Monroe, somewhere south of Easton, NJ.

Now to your antenna.

How high off the ground is it about?

Do you have a rotor?

Do you know if you have any amplifiers in the system?

Do you have any splitters going to more than one room even not hooked up but going through a splitter?
Its about 15 feet high. I do not have a rotor. Amplifiers? There arent any splitters.
 

shotinthedark

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#12
Here's a link to a ZIP code-based TVFool report for 08831. IIRC, that's a fairly flat area (partial disclosure: grew up in Morris County :cheers:; number of years elapsed since then shall remain undisclosed :eek:). The ZIP's land area should be compact, so this should be somewhat valid.

Almost all of those stations in green are from NYC (38 degrees, 38 miles), which should be an easy get with any decent all-channel antenna above the roof; Philly (246 degrees, 48 miles) is a bit more difficult, but by no means impossible with a roof antenna. The usual suspects are: Either some component of the system (antenna, downlead cable, splitter, etc.), or combination of them, has worn out from weathering or age; an amp is needed due to the number of sets running off the antenna; or there's too much amplification for one or two sets.
Where can I get an amp?
 

Don_M

DTVUSA Member
#13
You'll find the best quality and prices online. However, an amp shouldn't be necessary at all for one TV, except where the downlead cable is longer than 75 feet. An amp also won't do anything to help if the real reason for this reception issue is that the antenna or downlead are deteriorating due to age, or there's a bad connection, water ingress or corrosion developing somewhere. So please do some troubleshooting of the antenna and downlead first.

Replacing the downlead with RG-6 coaxial cable, and the coax transformer used to attach the cable to the antenna, is a good first step for two reasons: The downlead frequently goes bad before the antenna does, and this stuff is inexpensive -- maybe $30 or so. If new cable doesn't help, then it's time to consider getting a new antenna.

Trust me on this one: There are lots of pre-amps sitting in storage boxes in basements and garages throughout the country not because they're faulty, but because they weren't needed in the first place.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#14
Its about 15 feet high. I do not have a rotor. Amplifiers? There aren't any splitters.
you said you had a large antenna from the analog days, which should still work. A lot of your stations went from VHF to UHF when they went digital.

You may have too much loss between your antenna and your TV/Converter box to pull in UHF from NYCity.

One is to be sure your antenna is pointed at NYC since currently you don't have a rotor and will need one if you want to turn and point at Philly, as it's farther away and weaker. Where you might have needed to point at stations before with digital everything has to be perfect in a TV system.

If the coax and balun at the antenna is over 10 to 15 years old you probably want to replace it with good quality RG6 coax. And buy a new balun (the thing that hooks the coax to antenna screw terminals.

Then being sure you are pointed at NYC do a new channel scan and see what comes in.

If that doesn't help, try adding a Winegard AP8700 Chromstar 2000 Series VHF/UHF Pre Amplifier (AP-8700) | AP-8700 [Winegard] and leave it in the factory position of Fixed Trap In.

It's a two part system. One part needs to go up right below the antenna, so you need access to the antenna (you also do to change the coax and balun).

If you want Philly stations according to TVFool, you need to be able to turn the antenna.
 

shotinthedark

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#15
You'll find the best quality and prices online. However, an amp shouldn't be necessary at all for one TV, except where the downlead cable is longer than 75 feet. An amp also won't do anything to help if the real reason for this reception issue is that the antenna or downlead are deteriorating due to age, or there's a bad connection, water ingress or corrosion developing somewhere. So please do some troubleshooting of the antenna and downlead first.

Replacing the downlead with RG-6 coaxial cable, and the coax transformer used to attach the cable to the antenna, is a good first step for two reasons: The downlead frequently goes bad before the antenna does, and this stuff is inexpensive -- maybe $30 or so. If new cable doesn't help, then it's time to consider getting a new antenna.

Trust me on this one: There are lots of pre-amps sitting in storage boxes in basements and garages throughout the country not because they're faulty, but because they weren't needed in the first place.

My monitor is connected by 20+ feet of coax to the antenna which is in the attic.
 

shotinthedark

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#16
you said you had a large antenna from the analog days, which should still work. A lot of your stations went from VHF to UHF when they went digital.

You may have too much loss between your antenna and your TV/Converter box to pull in UHF from NYCity.

One is to be sure your antenna is pointed at NYC since currently you don't have a rotor and will need one if you want to turn and point at Philly, as it's farther away and weaker. Where you might have needed to point at stations before with digital everything has to be perfect in a TV system.

If the coax and balun at the antenna is over 10 to 15 years old you probably want to replace it with good quality RG6 coax. And buy a new balun (the thing that hooks the coax to antenna screw terminals.

Then being sure you are pointed at NYC do a new channel scan and see what comes in.

If that doesn't help, try adding a Winegard AP8700 Chromstar 2000 Series VHF/UHF Pre Amplifier (AP-8700) | AP-8700 [Winegard] and leave it in the factory position of Fixed Trap In.

It's a two part system. One part needs to go up right below the antenna, so you need access to the antenna (you also do to change the coax and balun).

If you want Philly stations according to TVFool, you need to be able to turn the antenna.
I didnt think trying to get Fox5 or Fox29 would be a hobby.
How do I get the antenna pointed at NY??
The coax was first installed in 1986 then replaced about 1995

If dont fix this its no Family Guy or the Simpsons. Maybe i should write Fox; cause I'm in the middle a a crowded community.
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
#17
I didnt think trying to get Fox5 or Fox29 would be a hobby.
How do I get the antenna pointed at NY??
The coax was first installed in 1986 then replaced about 1995

If dont fix this its no Family Guy or the Simpsons. Maybe i should write Fox; cause I'm in the middle a a crowded community.
Buy using the center of your zip code the Empire State Building is at 51 degrees on a compass (not the same as actual heading which is 38. But is you use a compass us 51 degrees. In the attic the compass might not be too accurate. But if you lot and house are square to north south east and west, and the actual heading is 38, then pointed just about north east and that should be close enough.

If the coax is all indoors it's not likely worn out.
 

shotinthedark

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#18
Here's a link to a ZIP code-based TVFool report for 08831. IIRC, that's a fairly flat area (partial disclosure: grew up in Morris County :cheers:; number of years elapsed since then shall remain undisclosed :eek:). The ZIP's land area should be compact, so this should be somewhat valid.

Almost all of those stations in green are from NYC (38 degrees, 38 miles), which should be an easy get with any decent all-channel antenna above the roof; Philly (246 degrees, 48 miles) is a bit more difficult, but by no means impossible with a roof antenna. The usual suspects are: Either some component of the system (antenna, downlead cable, splitter, etc.), or combination of them, has worn out from weathering or age; an amp is needed due to the number of sets running off the antenna; or there's too much amplification for one or two sets.
For some reason I missed the link til now, thanks
 

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