Wind does effect reception, UHF vs VHF

#1
It really does! When we get high winds the pic breaks up and then when everything gets calm again the pic returns.

Can someone tell me if VHF is better then UHF in terms of range and terrain? We have 1 channel in my market that is going back to VHF after june. (VHF-high)
 
#2
there is something between you and the transmitter a tree or something or your antenna is swaying in the wind, this is what is causing the breakup. The wind in its self will not cause a signal to drop.
if its a tree trim the limbs in front of the antenna if antenna stabilize the antenna so it does not move in the wind.:)
 
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Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#4
Static, is your antenna above the house next door to you and how close is the house? Unless it's really close, I can't imagine you're having a multipath or deflection problem. Does your antenna have a rotator, or have you tried modifying it's direction a little bit?
 

Jason Fritz

Administrator
Staff member
#6
You have a very nice house but need to upgrade your antenna to either a 91xg or db8.

Word.
:p:D:p Your neighbor's choice in mustard yellow exterior paint has to be doing wonders to property value in the area. ;)

High winds affect your DTV signal reception? How is the antenna attached to the house?
 
#8
The 91-xg would have less wind load and would move less in high winds than the DB8 if you want a bow tie that has less wind load use the antenna craft U 8000 less gain but no screen to catch the wind. you could also tilt the antenna direct 91-xg to shoot over the buildings next door
 

TonyT

DTVUSA Member
#9
Yeah, speaking of wind loads, think I saw a youtube video of someone flying the DB8 as a kite one time, that thing looks like it could catch some serious air if a gust of wind ever came along. ;)
 
G

Guest

Guest
#10
Not true. Wind will affect a digital signal since it is sending light particles, not radio waves like with the former NTSC standard. Since the signals are light particles wind,(because of dust it kicks up)will effect the transmission, as will trees and buildings. The best response is to get a powered UHF antenna.
 

SWHouston

Moderator
Staff member
#11
Wind, in and of it's self should have no effect on a Signal. I would think that your Antenna is marginally directed toward the station, and or the mounting integrity is the problem. Reset the direction, or reinforce the mounting, or both. However, under some very rare circumstances, where one was in an extremely dry climate, static buildup may be an issue.
 
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n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#12
Not true. Wind will affect a digital signal since it is sending light particles, not radio waves like with the former NTSC standard. Since the signals are light particles wind,(because of dust it kicks up)will effect the transmission, as will trees and buildings. The best response is to get a powered UHF antenna.
Actually with both analog and digital they are sending RF. Light and RF are both electromagnetic waves. Light is just a much shorter wavelength.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#13
Experienced high winds last night. At least 30 mile per hour gusts. No pixelation and no fluctuations in signal strength from my 2nd edge stations that are 48 miles away. Wind alone doesn't cause reception problems, but it is possible that wind blowing the receiving antenna, tree leaves, or etc. can cause reception problems.
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#14
Not true. Wind will affect a digital signal since it is sending light particles, not radio waves like with the former NTSC standard. Since the signals are light particles wind,(because of dust it kicks up)will effect the transmission, as will trees and buildings. The best response is to get a powered UHF antenna.
Actually with both analog and digital they are sending RF. Light and RF are both electromagnetic waves. Light is just a much shorter wavelength.
Indeed. As far as your antenna is concerned, it is receiving the exact same thing as before.

Wind, in and of it's self should have no effect on a Signal. I would think that your Antenna is marginally directed toward the station, and or the mounting integrity is the problem. Reset the direction, or reinforce the mounting, or both. However, under some very rare circumstances, where one was in an extremely dry climate, static buildup may be an issue.
Experienced high winds last night. At least 30 mile per hour gusts. No pixelation and no fluctuations in signal strength from my 2nd edge stations that are 48 miles away. Wind alone doesn't cause reception problems, but it is possible that wind blowing the receiving antenna, tree leaves, or etc. can cause reception problems.
Most of the issues I have found with this relate to poorly mounted antennas (especially poorly guyed masts). With multipath issues being more prevalent in ATSC land i imagkine dynamic multipath would be a major cause there too, though its not unheard of here. Its also possible that damaged/corroded cabling which is poorly attached is blowing around in the wind (esp. if it hasnt been run back down the mast itself and is just hanging).
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#15
Yes, I agree that poorly mounted antennas are usually to blame. That and leafed tree limbs in the way to cause multipath.

By the way, I know that the capital is Canberra and not Sydney. :)
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#16
Not true. Wind will affect a digital signal since it is sending light particles, not radio waves like with the former NTSC standard. Since the signals are light particles, wind (because of dust it kicks up) will effect the transmission, as will trees and buildings.
So now we all know why CBS uses an eyeball as its logo. Ha ha!



Nonsense.
 
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nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#20
Shouldnt affect too much, but its been a while since we've had a big one - so could be wrong. One thing to watch out with hail is elements bending/breaking/falling off - especially on horizontally polarised antennas. Also an sun-damaged pre-amps or other sundamaged plastic housings can crack under the barrage.
 
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