Wind does effect reception, UHF vs VHF

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#21
Can you tell the rest of your country! :p
If it's any consolation, when people think of "America" they think of New York, which is completely unlike America in general.

Anyway, I am not really "from" America. Yes, I'm an American citizen but I was born and raised in Trinidad and Tobago in the Caribbean. I actually learned about Oz in my non-US secondary schooling, LOL.
 

n2rj

Moderator
Staff member
#22
Hail, rain, snow and precipitation in general do cause problems but only if you are far away. This is due to signal attenuation and multipath. I used to lose WCBS-DT regularly when they were on pre-transition channel 56, when there was bad weather. Now that they are on 33 they are rock solid.
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#23
Ive actually found that cloud cover can increase signal by [im assuming] partially reflecting signals back to earth. Of course terrain is a strong consideration, and as you say rain can have a effect on ultra-fringe installations.
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#24
If it's any consolation, when people think of "America" they think of New York, which is completely unlike America in general.
Now now, we get enough american tv to know there that America has 6 cities: New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Florida, Los Angeles and San Franscisco. The rest of the country is divided between Democrat states and Jesus-land. Parts of Jesus-land experience a plague of tornadoes annually, and Im pretty sure you are allowed to shoot people.


:usa2:




Just kidding guys! :becky:
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#25
OK, so wind shouldn't affect RF signals to any appreciable degree.
Rain or normal snowfall -- no biggie.

How about a big ol' hail storm? :fish2:
Neither rain nor snow nor dark of night has kept DTV signals from making their appointed rounds to me. That includes hail storms.



One exception was a few years ago when the CBS translator I usually use ran out of diesel to run its backup generator after its power lines went down during a two foot snowfall. I had to switch my antennas to receive their 'main' local transmitter. Click - done. No loss of received programming here.

Jim
 
#29
Cloud cover will indeed "boost" some reception in some instances, and wind does diminish signal. With strong signal, you would not see any difference. These things show up affecting the channels with low signal.

Some winds affect my reception while using my indoor Grabbit Ears antenna. Winds increase scatter reflections from trees and also can affect your outside antenna or the transmitting antenna.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#30
Now now, we get enough american tv to know there that America has 6 cities: New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Florida, Los Angeles and San Franscisco. The rest of the country is divided between Democrat states and Jesus-land. Parts of Jesus-land experience a plague of tornadoes annually, and Im pretty sure you are allowed to shoot people.
:usa2:
Just kidding guys! :becky:
Actually most Democrats (also known as the immoral majority) live mostly in the major cities. If you look at it on a county level almost all of the land mass is Republican. There are only very small enclaves of Democrats in and around the major cities. Personally I hope we split this thing into two or three countries so we can deport all the Democrats to the northeast or California so they can cheat, rob, and murder themselves to their heart's content without it bringing God's wrath down on the rest of us.
 
G

Guest

Guest
#32
my antenna is indoors and generally gets great reception but today we have 30 mph sustained wind w/ 40-45 gusts. My reception totally sucks today.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#33
my antenna is indoors and generally gets great reception but today we have 30 mph sustained wind w/ 40-45 gusts. My reception totally sucks today.
I suspect that is the weather system that caused the winds that's affecting your reception, rather than the wind itself.
 
#35
I experienced some dropouts during some very strong wind gusts the other day. I was watching the weakest station that I receive. The drops precisely coincided with the most powerful gusts of wind. I don't have drops on the stronger stations, though and I have experienced this before. My antennae (Grabbit Ears -2) are inside but there was no missing the connection to the wind noise and the drops. Perhaps the electron shedding of the wind on the home caused the temporary drops by possibly creating a sort of "shielding" by the shed electrons...
 
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#37
The wind itself does not directly affect reception, but moving tree branches in the immediate area can upset the signal patterns arriving at the antenna. Same thing happens if someone lives near an airport. When a plane flys by it can change the way the signals arrive at the antenna, even if not directly in front of the antenna. These interruptions tend to have more affect on UHF than VHF from my expereience.
 
#38
there was no missing the connection to the wind noise and the drops. Perhaps the electron shedding of the wind on the home caused the temporary drops by possibly creating a short "shielding" of shed electrons...
Wow! He cookin' with gas now! :hail:

You simply can't say there's "no connection" between wind and reception. Doooooooon't even think it. It flies in the face of the immortal Ted Nelson's addage: "Everything is deeply intertwingled."

Rick
 
#40
Wind does affect signal - "weather" you experience it or not.

The wind itself does not directly affect reception, but moving tree branches in the immediate area can upset the signal patterns arriving at the antenna.(If wind doesn't affect reception then how are the branches moving?) Same thing happens if someone lives near an airport. When a plane flys by it can change the way the signals arrive at the antenna, even if not directly in front of the antenna.(When a planes fly by they disturb air patterns. Sounds like changes in air pressures results in changes in signal.) These interruptions tend to have more affect on UHF than VHF from my expereience. (All disruptions to signal affect the UHF in greater amounts than VHF due to the inherent "strength" of the signal. The lower longer VHF waves have a greater penetration and are the stronger waves. That's why the digital transition occurred so that cell phone carriers and others could get their hands on the good strong waves of VHF. And that't why we are looking for better antennae than we were using... )
So, wind does affect signal, many of us have witnessed this. It is theorized that wind can do this in two different ways. One suggested method is an increased scattering of signal due to leaves in the wind. Unfortunately, the leaves are all gone for the season and yet I've just recently witnessed some dropping in high wind. I am less convinced that "scattering" is the reason, though I've said it myself.

This leads me to think more in regards to electron shedding. One of the reasons we ground (bond) an antenna to the grounding system is to act as a "drain". Wind for example as it blows across an antenna loads the antenna with a static electric charge. Satellite dishes are prone to LNB failure if the metal dish itself is not also grounded. The static builds up and eventually discharges to the LNB causing failure. The ground will "drain" excess and spurious energies such as static, voltage surges and transients, and stray signals.

This being said we are talking about indoor antennae that are not grounded or exposed to the wind itself. What then? Shedding happens. Electron shedding will happen as wind passes over metal or vinyl siding, and glass windows also. The faster the wind, the greater the shedding. I expect that this shedding increases to a point that the shed electrons create a temporary barrier of noise that overwhelms the signal for a very short period of time thus causing the short drops.

There is also the possibility of a another reason, compression. In the case of the airplane dropouts we have three possible explanations. Airplanes cause great disturbance of air (wind). From ground level we don't even feel the breeze unless you are at a very specific place on a calm day. So, for my part, I don't think wind is the culprit in this case. Also, breezes don't affect my reception at home.

Airplanes also cause great disturbances in pressure (compression). Here is where we have similarity to the drops at home. I notice the wind effects at home when the wind is so great as to definitely create a difference in pressure gradients. I expect that this causes a compression of signals that temporarily creates drops in the home and explains a portion of the airplane situation.

And last regarding airplanes (but not wind) they also are sources of great electrical interference from rf signals that may cause disruption of the signal at home known as noise. Antennae receive unrelated signals that can become a part of your signal as noise. When there is too much noise for your signal, you will lose picture. The Grabbit Ears antenna, for example, have been known to receive the signal generated by a certain car starter causing temporary drops when that car was started. I also have known them to receive the signal created when a light switch is turned on or off. (Creates a very short pixelation as the "spark" happens and rf is radiated.)

Wind does affect signal. It is only in "how" it affects signal that is in question. Any suggestions???

Highdef Jeff
 
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