WSAZ-TV - Channel 3 - Huntington, WV - Early Digital Transition

divxhacker

DTVUSA Member
#2
And so the DTV transition begins...

It's going to be an interesting couple of months as lower-budget stations already broadcasting digital have to decide whether or not to stay on the analog bands to the end. Those that are staying to the end the wealthy corporate networks which can still afford to transmit both analog and digital. CBS, ABC, NBC, and Fox are the main ones staying. And of course, it depends on the broadcast markets. Areas that don't watch much OTA TV are probably going to switch over completely than to stay on the analog networks.

So for your small local broadcast station, they can shut off their analog systems early. Hawaii already has done the switchover ages ago.

For some stations, this delay to June spells death - they may close their doors as they would not afford to remain operating, as advertisers would pay more to advertise on analog/digital combo stations, not digital only stations during this extended transition. They would want their ads to be seen on stations that are covering all the bases. Those that don't, get plowed under. If the broadcasters needed to renew the equipment lease to continue coverage, it could be a problem - I don't think the analog equipment contractors would write a lease for 4 months at 4 months' price without early termination fees. Som won't be able to renew the lease because the equipment has been commited to be sold already.

What a mess for broadcasters, eh?

For those of us who are already ready, try to make a habit of scanning for new stations in your lineup. You might get a couple of junk-looking ststions now, but later on, you might find a gem on those stations when channel surfing! Last scan: I lost one channel, have to see what it was. (using repurposed Motorola VOOM box)
 

Jason Fritz

Administrator
Staff member
#3
It's going to be an interesting couple of months as lower-budget stations already broadcasting digital have to decide whether or not to stay on the analog bands to the end. Those that are staying to the end the wealthy corporate networks which can still afford to transmit both analog and digital. CBS, ABC, NBC, and Fox are the main ones staying. And of course, it depends on the broadcast markets. Areas that don't watch much OTA TV are probably going to switch over completely than to stay on the analog networks.

So for your small local broadcast station, they can shut off their analog systems early. Hawaii already has done the switchover ages ago.

For some stations, this delay to June spells death - they may close their doors as they would not afford to remain operating, as advertisers would pay more to advertise on analog/digital combo stations, not digital only stations during this extended transition. They would want their ads to be seen on stations that are covering all the bases. Those that don't, get plowed under. If the broadcasters needed to renew the equipment lease to continue coverage, it could be a problem - I don't think the analog equipment contractors would write a lease for 4 months at 4 months' price without early termination fees. Som won't be able to renew the lease because the equipment has been commited to be sold already.

What a mess for broadcasters, eh?

For those of us who are already ready, try to make a habit of scanning for new stations in your lineup. You might get a couple of junk-looking ststions now, but later on, you might find a gem on those stations when channel surfing! Last scan: I lost one channel, have to see what it was. (using repurposed Motorola VOOM box)
Completely agreed. On the other side of things, I wonder what the cost is for a small station to keep the analog waves going. You know they're going to lose potential viewers the minute they transition to digital. 5%? 10%? 15%? Are advertisers going to get better rate per 30 second spot?
 

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