Xg-91

#1
I purchased a Terrestrial Digital XG 91 over the weekend and found the balun box is (plastic) not weather tight where the top and bottom halves snap together. Should I leave it as it is or put a sealant around the seam? Drill a hole in the bottom to let water out maybe?
Stan
 

Tim58hsv

DTVUSA Member
#2
I'm taking a shot in the dark here but it seems a sealant would be a good idea. Putting a hole in the bottom of the balun box could introduce more moisture into it than it would eliminate.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#3
Stan,

I'll take a shot too. I would seal it with RTV (room temperature vulcanizing silicon rubber - not the Network), but first, I would remove the lower portion of the box and drill a very tiny hole using a wire-gauge drill bit, such as size #80 which is 0.0135". Being under 1/64", that size is probably too small for a droplet of water or most bugs to pass thru it but it will allow for expansion and contraction of the air that would otherwise be trapped inside the box. :cool:

I have three Channel Master jointennas and their design allows water to enter them: if I was to use one, I would do the same thing.

Jim
 
#6
The balun box has two loops (1/16X3/8") that go into it with rubber boots to seal the metal. That aria was where I thought water might enter. I will try the RV sealant before I put the up the antenna.
Thanks for the Ideas
Stan
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#7
You might request a new balun. You paid a lot of money, you might as well get a decent balun. And if the replacement you get is the same, THEN try the RTV.
 
#8
I put up the XG-91 and I am getting a UHF channel at 57 miles and 50 degrees that I was wanting, I used a winegard 8780 pre-amp because I had one already. My plans were to add a YA 1713 for VHF stations that I would like. The trouble is the XG-91 is picking up two VHF stations (8 and 10 at 348-352 degrees-57-59 miles) so this will cause interference? with the VHF antenna and if so what can I do to control the interference.
 
#9
The trouble is the XG-91 is picking up two VHF stations (8 and 10 at 348-352 degrees-57-59 miles) so this will cause interference? with the VHF antenna and if so what can I do to control the interference.
Combine the 2 antennas with a UVSJ before the preamp & you will be good to go. It will efficiently combine the 2 antennas & isolate any interference between them. Glad to hear the good news about your reception.:thumb:
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#11
for 2 uhf, you just need a "splitter" to combine them. Make sure both feed cables (antenna to splitter) are the same length.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#13
for 2 uhf, you just need a "splitter" to combine them. Make sure both feed cables (antenna to splitter) are the same length.
In my experience, combining two same-band antennas with a splitter follows the rules almost to the letter: it won't work unless the antennas are identical and (usually) pointed the same direction (as in stacked antennas). There are exceptions here, but again, only using identical antennas.

The problem: any signals received on antenna 'A' are split between your TV set and 'rebroadcast' by antenna 'B'. The same for the signals antenna 'B' receives: only half (energy) of those signals reach your TV and the other half goes to antenna 'A'. There also may be issues with certain channels (frequencies) that are not compatible when mixed with a splitter.

A few weeks ago I attempted to beat the odds and join different antennas on the same coax with some success: although there was considerable signal loss, some channels had enough energy to provide a good picture and there was no significant change in BER, however, other channels simply vanished either from too little signal or added multipath from two different antenna sources.

I determined my cause was hopeless, so I am in the process of installing three coaxial systems around the house to accommodate three different antenna arrays. I wish there was a device similar to a UVSJ that would allow me to combine 'low UHF' with a channel 62 'high UHF analog translator.

Jim
 
#14
I wish there was a device similar to a UVSJ that would allow me to combine 'low UHF' with a channel 62 'high UHF analog translator.

Jim
Hi Jim,

An HLSJ can efficiently join a low band antenna with a UHF antenna, but I'm not sure if this would accomplish what you need to make your entire system work on just one downlead? The HLSJ passes all the UHF channels up to at least channel 69 from my testing.
 
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