Yahoo may poach YouTubers for rival service

tmcmeekin

DTVUSA Member
#1
Rumor is that Yahoo! is planning to start its own video service to compete with YouTube, and that it is going to lure some of the most popular YouTube stars with promises of a larger cut of advertising revenue, and other perks, in order to gain an audience quickly.

Yahoo! already has tried to make video services, but nothing as popular as YouTube, nor as accessible for content creators. Yahoo! Video, a YouTube-like service, was closed in 2010. Flickr allows video uploads, but the service is built for still photography and video is more of an afterthought (and, it has enough trouble keeping photographers happy). Yahoo! Screen is mostly an aggregator, pulling content from major websites and TV production companies. There's not much that is exclusive to the service. There's also no way for individuals to submit content and no social features.

I think the idea is great, because there's some dissatisfaction in the YouTuber community with some of Google/YouTube's policies, and because I think more competition in this market is a good thing.

If you're a content creator, would you upload your content to Yahoo's possible service, YouTube, or both? And if you're a viewer, would you follow your favorite YouTubers to a new site?
 

Aaron62

Contributor
Staff member
#2
Yahoo is about a decade late to the dance with this one. Google is so ingrained in the web with YouTube, search results and core users/content that it'll be impossible for anyone to offer anything that is better.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#3
I am often unhappy with Google's dominance of so much of the web and some of Google's practices and policies. Like not allowing YouTube on Roku, and allowing bots to delete blogs without warning or recourse.

I don't have any content on YouTube, but I watch video there. I'll watch video from any source that makes its content available for free on my TV.
 

Funafuti

DTVUSA Member
#4
I am all for competition making everyone better, but there is also something to be said for the convenience of everything being in one place. There is, evidently, a complete contradiction in my brain between monopolies being inherently bad yet centralization being easier to deal with as a consumer of media. I guess what I'm saying is I can imagine a scenario in which some content providers strike exclusive deals with either YouTube or this hypothetical Yahoo! service, spreading out things I want to access over two sites. Kind of a hassle. But I know that innovations and improvements are often driven by competition, and that, in the end, that's more important.
 

tmcmeekin

DTVUSA Member
#5
Yahoo is about a decade late to the dance with this one. Google is so ingrained in the web with YouTube, search results and core users/content that it'll be impossible for anyone to offer anything that is better.
I don't think it's impossible. However, I agree that it will be very hard. I'm not sure if Yahoo will be up to the task.
 

tmcmeekin

DTVUSA Member
#6
I am all for competition making everyone better, but there is also something to be said for the convenience of everything being in one place. There is, evidently, a complete contradiction in my brain between monopolies being inherently bad yet centralization being easier to deal with as a consumer of media. I guess what I'm saying is I can imagine a scenario in which some content providers strike exclusive deals with either YouTube or this hypothetical Yahoo! service, spreading out things I want to access over two sites. Kind of a hassle. But I know that innovations and improvements are often driven by competition, and that, in the end, that's more important.
Competition, and having everything in the same place, are not mutually exclusive. Broadcast TV did it for decades. It's called adopting STANDARDS. Web video, right now, has no standards (and I mean that in a technical way, not in a rating content way).

Every single major company has their own system which doesn't work with any other system. Sure, Netflix and Hulu may both work on a Roku, but that's because each company has built an app from the ground up for that device. Apple TV? New app. Gaming system? New app. Only the biggest companies can afford to create an app for every device, and often the devices are made by competing companies, so there's devices which are left out in the cold. This hurts small content producers the most, because they're basically forced to go to YouTube or some less popular knockoff, and even then their options and audiences are severely limited.

The web community should demand video standards be accepted, and actually be used, by the entire media world right now.
 
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