Your Dollar-Draining, Energy-Sucking, Carbon-Polluting Cable TV Habit

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#1
From The Article:
So we already knew that watching too much TV dulls the mind and costs a bundle (my cable bill is $170 a month, including Internet and phone).
Now we know, thanks to a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council, that your super-snazzy, set-top box and DVR combo that means you will never have to miss another episode of "Two and a Half Men" is costing you more money, wasting energy and generating carbon emissions.

With more than 80 percent of Americans now subscribing to cable, the numbers taken as a whole grow pretty big, the NRDC says:

In 2010, the electricity required to operate all U.S. set-top boxes was equal to the annual household electricity consumption of the entire state of Maryland, resulted in 16 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, and cost households more than $3 billion.
Read More: https://www.greenbiz.com/blog/2011/...nergy-sucking-carbon-polluting-cable-tv-habit

This goes for pretty much all newer home electronics. The Channel Master CM-7000pal Antenna DVR uses about 24 watts turned on and 23 watts turned off. My new Dynex 26" HDTV uses 75 watts turned on and 35 watts turned off. DVRs should be left powered up, but it may make sense to power down other unused electronics.
 
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Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
Let's not be misled by the 'greenies'. A 100 watt light bulb gives off 100 watts of heat much like a hand-held hair dryer rated at 1500 watts provides 1500 watts of heat. My 40 year old Kenwood KT-1000 AM-FM tuner draws 15 watts. Its a fantastic tuner that cost me $5.00 at a garage sale.

I prefer component stereo systems/home theater setups for several reasons including the ability to turn off individual parts of a system when they are not being used.
If you don't need the heat, why not turn the unit off? :huh:

On the other hand, D to A converter boxes and DVRs must remain turned on (or in standby mode) to receive TVGOS updates.

Jim

Google Image Result for http://www.vintage-tuner.com/tuner2/kenwood/kenwood_kt-1000-us-01.jpg
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#3
The only reason most of these boxes and TV sets need electric when "off" is to turn it on with the remote and retain programming info.

You would think engineers would be smart enough to lower the power consumption and use a (consumer replaceable) battery for the power required for standby? Opps, sorry. I used the words "smart" and "engineer" in the same sentence.

BTW, DTV converter boxes use about 1 watt when powered down.
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#4
You would think engineers would be smart enough to lower the power consumption and use a (consumer replaceable) battery for the power required for standby? Opps, sorry. I used the words "smart" and "engineer" in the same sentence.
Trip and I may let you get by with insulting us this one time. Now, my Dynex that pulls 35 watts while off maintains the programming even when unplugged, indicating flash memory that doesn't require power. So, all it needs the 35 watts for is to be ready to turn on. Most DVRs have the hard drive spun up most, if not all, of the time so you can have instant on and buffering. That explains the high power consumption for them... But, some of these other things? Hmmm!
 
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